Friday Food – Garden Veggies (and BRIE cheese)

Hello – for Friday Food October 6th, 2017 – I have a photo of some scraps from the garden.

 

I barely kept a few veggie containers going this summer.  Woodland gnome recently wrote that “Autumn often brings a bit of imperfection to the garden” – well for me, this imperfection defined my small garden ALL year long.

Imperfect and neglected many days – but still enjoyable.  In addition to containers, I also had a small semi-raised bed going, but the handful of plants did not do very well. That small raised bed has a bunch of deep under roots (stealing nutrients) from nearby trees and it has these cluster root chunks, which I thought would break down – they are from an old invasive blackberry bush that used to dwell nearby.

So I have new plans for next year – I will still have some container plants (because as many readers also know – (like Tish – here and Ana here) growing  your own goodies is a great way to add some zest to life.  The smell of home-grown basil, the taste of a fresh cherry tomato, and having various peppers coming from your own yard is just fun) – but next year I will move the small raised bed and maybe make it higher – and closer….

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While on the Friday Food topic – would you believe I had brie four times in September? It is not a cheese I eat very often, but I am starting to have a little because the fat content in brie offers many perks – including helping us absorb nutrients. The fat comes from the extra cream added before the curd develops.

Fomaggio’s Kitchen (here) explained it this way: The terms “double-crème” and “triple-crème” are bandied about a lot in cheese shops. While most folks have a general idea of what they mean in terms of texture (creamy, spreadable!) and flavor (buttery, lactic!) for a cheese, these terms actually have very specific meanings. Both double and triple-crème cheeses have extra cream added before the curd is formed. And, at least according to French law, a double-crème cheese has between 60-75% butterfat. Cheeses that fall into this category are some Brie” and “The first ever double-crème cheese was made in Normandy in 1850 and was called Petit Suisse.”

 

So while I might have skipped this quieter item on a tray – I find myself now going back to make sure I have a little brie. However, at Ct’s party, I did not have the chance to eat the piece of brie I graciously cut and placed on my plate (long story).  So I took it to go (I know, I know, no comment on that one).  I then enjoyed that little piece of brie later at home and it was such a treat! I microwaved it on the pretzel crackers and discovered that scorched brie could be tasty.

So here are instructions for “microwave-scorched” brie.

This is totally a joke and I do not normally suggest microwaving the heck out of a piece of brie.

Scorched Brie on Pretzel Cracker

  1. While at art show (or party) if you cannot get the chance to eat your little slice of brie – slickly wrap it up for travel. Or start with any slice of brie.
  2. Unwrap your small slice of brie at home.
  3. Place brie on top of pretzel cracker(s) on a plate.
  4. Microwave for 10 to 20 seconds (microwaves vary) don’t over mic the brie or it will get rubbery- you just want it sizzlin’ warm. And while I would normally say only use the toaster oven for a reheat (or pan) for a reheat-  there are times when after a long day you need to use the microwave – IMHO)
  5. Add a few slices of peppers to your plate – (or any veggie)
  6. Sip some warm tea (cheese is always better with warm tea).
  7. For extra relaxation and refreshment, do a quick foot soak and watch a rerun of The Profit while enjoying your after-party scorched brie. 

All jokes aside….

HERE IS A CHEESY POTATO RECIPE from Diane’s food blog (@In Diane’s Kitchen)

Cheesy Bacon Hasselback Potato

Difficulty: easy

Ingredients
IMG_9538

2 medium potatoes

5-6 pats of butter

2 heaping Tbl cooked crumbled bacon pieces

salt and pepper to taste

1 green onion, sliced

1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Directions

Clean potatoes scrubbing with a brush. Place a wooden spoon next to the potato and slice the potato stopping at the wooden spoon so you don’t cut all the way through the potato. Cut a pat of butter into four pieces. Place a little piece of butter in between each slice of potato. Place a piece of bacon and green onion slice on each side of the butter. Salt and pepper to taste. Top with shredded cheddar cheese. Microwave in a dish for about 8 minutes or until tender or bake in a dish in a pre heated 375 degrees oven for 40-60 minutes or until tender. Full post from Diane is here.

Thanks for reading…. and happy eating!

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44 thoughts on “Friday Food – Garden Veggies (and BRIE cheese)

  1. Do you mean fat from cheese is good for you (I know any thing must be in moderation)? I really like brie but fear of high fat content. I hardly have it, only once in a long while..

    Liked by 1 person

      1. right on – but keep in mind that many food choices will depend on what you have going on in your gut – and what you pair the food with…
        please let me know if you try it.
        and I heard fresh from the oven brie is best….

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Love the scorched brie recipe 😉 🙂
    Nice vegies 🙂 It looks like my tomato plants planned to surprise me as well. I was about to get rid of them today, thinking they’d lived their life, but I found that most of them have a few more tiny, pea size tomatoes. So I’m letting them be for now, I’m sure they’ll die of natural causes soon, given the weather. Anyway, I had fun with my window garden this year 🙂 And yes, I took a couple of photos just for you today 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. well I look forward to the photos – and right on to find some new pea size tomatoes starting – and as you noted – the weather will choose their fate in time… but in the meantime – who knows how many toamtoes will come. and ana – reading your comment made me realize another reason why I like to plant veggies – it really is a weird kind of exciting to see things grow.
      one year I had an eggplant take off – and we don;t even really like it – well if dining out I used to get eggplant parm back in the day – but to grow it and have so many eggplants was way too much – so I gifted 99% out and made some soup with a handful. But it was so fun

      Liked by 1 person

      1. My thoughts exactly… I’ll let them be, they don’t bother anybody, and if there’s still a few tomatoes in them, that’s even better 🙂
        It is satisfying to see things grow, even if it is an eggplant (not a big fan either, there are only a few dishes in which I can tolerate them). When growing veggies or flowers, you get to see progress in a short while, you feel rewarded (at least that’s what I feel) 🙂

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  3. I love brie. I don’t have a microwave, but of course, I believe you when you say this scorched melty treat is good 🙂
    I throw mine in the lowest temp on the oven, I think 170 maybe, and when the oven reaches that temp, beep beep! I take it out. Yaaasss. Am hungry now. Haha!
    I had a crap year in the veggie garden. I blame the weather, but I know deep inside my lower compost deposits added to the precipitation and sunshine issues. When I was working, I didn’t make time to compost EVERYTHING. Sigh.
    Anyway, imperfect usually tastes great regardless! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I know a group of folks who would applaud you for not having a microwave. For a brief period of time, i wanted ours removed – or at least put in the garage – and um – not happening lol – and so after chilling out – I find myself using the microwave for a few things….but heard that it destroys nutrients, etc.

      and after reading your comment I want some oven-baked brie now….

      also – thanks for sharing the crap year – and there were myriad of things here too – like yours – the sunshine – precip, compost and for me – a few times – complete neglect

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We had one of those over-the-range microwaves when we bought this house, and it was a bitch to take out. Truth is, only the girls used it for oatmeal, which they’ve now learned to cook in a pan. It wasn’t my thing, but I don’t have anything against microwaves.

        Don’t you know I’ve got brie in the oven? And some Honeycrisps sliced, waiting 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. well I think I recall an old post of yours about the removal of that mic – and omg – complete tease with the brie – cos I forgot how good apples pair with it – and wonder how the honey crisp will work with the cheese flavor layer (m)

        Liked by 1 person

    1. well thanks for sharing – and I have to watch the potential for rants here – but it is funny how we harp on dangers of cigarettes yet stay misinformed about the way sugar “pulls” from nutrients and SUPPRESSES IMMUNITY – many now believe these standard high sugar diets also mess with gland function, synaptic activity and then it gets worse if their is candidiasis and high heavy metals – a lose lose internal condition that causes many probs….

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      1. Agree. Sugar in everything. They try to fool you about it. Do you read the nutritional %’s on packaged / processed foods as per normal daily ? Everything is in % except sugar which is in grams and only the most nutrition informed know the quantity meaning. 40 grams for instance is normal suggested for an adult and that is found in one regular soda !

        Liked by 1 person

      2. you are so right – it is very ambiguous – and for me – I never would have used white sugar – but I did not realize that agave nectar was all sugar – or that when I had tea and toast my body processed that toast as a carb – and I know we need fuel – but slowly- over the last 100 years we have lost our way with sugar and carbs….
        and can’t even go there with soda cos of the high fructose corn syrup – which is a type of sweetener that actually scars the liver….
        ugh

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  4. The quality of the soil is quite important for growing fruit and vegetables. I tried to grow carrots in a place where the soil was a bit stony. They were deformed and a bit bitter. My lemon tree died because it was to close to a much larger tree that took all the nutrients out of the soil. I also love brie.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. thanks for sharing the experience – and sometimes I have these garden analogies come (ok – many times) and when you wrote about your carrots – it reminded me of some maturity in people “deformed and a bit bitter” – lol
      and sorry about the loss of the lemon tree – that happened to my peach tree 9and it had a trunk fungus)
      cheers to brie….

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  5. Ah, to have a garden. We had a few tomatoes and next year I plan on trying to actually plant more food! Going to need a lot of luck, I’m sure, cause neither one of us knows what we’re doing! I don’t think I’ve had Brie. I’ll have to try it one of these days! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi L – well I seem to recall that you have a lot of shade as you live in the Georgia jungle/forest – ha!
      so do you have very many sunny spots?
      and at least you had tomatoes –
      I satrted with “not having anything this year” – but my oregano emerged – a very old planting – and then one leek came up – and I was lured in – then leaving Trader Joe’s I had basil in the cart – and at another store a week later – veggies were 4 for….. and well – that is how it happened for me this year –
      and let me know when you try brie – I think it is way better warmed

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yep, we’re mostly shade. But I think we have a small patch in back that would get enough sun for a garden. I was going to try growing some herbs in pots on my patio but it’s completely shaded. sigh….

        Liked by 1 person

      2. sigh – ahhh
        but I think some herbs might be able to grow in mostly shade – not an expert like some bloggers – but my parsley used to come up in like 5 spots – that was fun – it was readily available – and basil is usually super easy – hm – well looking forward to hearing what unfolds (and sprouts up) next year – I cannot do zuchinni or squash – they do not do well in my yard so I said forget it

        Liked by 1 person

  6. That is some two-coloured red-green pepper there. It must taste amazing 😀 I love cheese, and really love brie. I do like it when my cheese is both creamy and tasty. Sometimes that combo is hard to come by, lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. you are right – that combo can be hard to come by – and for the longest time i was very partial to hard cheeses. (and sorry for the late reply – I missed your nice comment – )

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Amigo, your Friday food post is a delicious read.

    “I then enjoyed that little piece of brie later at home and it was such a treat!” – I understand the feeling here – have done this myself (not cheese but other food).

    And: “The smell of home-grown basil, the taste of a fresh cherry tomato, and having various peppers coming from your own yard is just fun” – Totally. Home grown is our own! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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