Thursday Doors (country doors, wreaths, tech talk, and laundry)

Hello Blog friends – it feels so good to put up a Priorhouse door post.

Please join me as we explore a few doors from a small country town in Virginia (about 70 minutes outside of Richmond). 

Definitely a unique door stopper. Custom and one-of-a-kind.

Another old country door. Look at the little curtain on the top window. That curtain is what caught my eye.  Was this the trend at some point? The door has three windows, let’s go ahead and hang a valance and only cover the top window? (And I guess the valance came out in the Renaissance Era to cover hardware – and they are still being hung today.)

 

The square wreath (above) caught my eye.
Across the street, these two summer wreathes (above) did not disappoint.

 

 

 

In this next photo, Not sure if you can see the laundry to the right- 

– but to the far back right we have laundry hanging out on a clothesline. I once read an article about a lady who hung our her clothes just to have them smell like fresh air. She had a high-tech dryer and all the gadgets – but decided to hang a small line (for the season) and she took the time to hang her laundry items with clothespins. It did not convince me to do the same (thank God for dryers) but the passion in her writing was fresh and alive. I could feel her smile as she wrote about pulling down the dried items and bringing them to her nose to sniff. This also had the perk of being “green” – and it was just a nice thought to think of someone so excited about hanging laundry. 

The door on this small tractor seemed quite high tech: huge wiper, strong handle, and the glass looked weather proof (maybe add a nice little valance at the top… kidding). 
The tractor – and the country vibe reminded me of this painting by Larson (1999) called The Color Of Daylight

 

Here is a closer view of the laundry hanging out. Looks like the homeowner has the same t-shirt in a few different colors – and on spunky says he might wear that neon yellow one. Just kidding – but when I noticed the laundry in the photo – I also realized how much privacy today’s indoors machines provide.

We totally take laundry rooms for granted, and so right now I am very glad that I do not have to hang out all of my sheets, shorts, shirts, undergarments, etc. for neighbors to see – sure is nice to have privacy. 

Seriously, I know there are different levels of wealth in the world – but to have a private area for doing laundry – sheeeeeet….. very grateful.

Get it – the play on words for sheet and shit –

which was inspired by this character from The Wire – where he says sheeeeeeeeit:

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And speaking of privacy – did you notice all of the privacy updates this past week? 

Well for those who do not know, on May 25th, 2018 The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect after four years of development. 

The GDPR is the latest European system of regulations aimed at “creating a unified approach to data protection across the EU.”

I guess the LA Times and a few other sites were blacked out for a while (in the EU) for non-compliance of these new privacy updates.

These privacy updates seem like a good thing and I hope the US does something similar too. 

This tweet sums up how some people felt inundated with privacy updates in a matter of a few days:

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In closing, this little sign had a nice country feel – “Kind people are my kinda people”  –

I agree with that – from city folk to country bumpkins – kindness offers universal freshness

That is all for my door post. 

Hope you have a great Thursday and if you want to see more doors – or share some doors of your own – check out Norm’s blog here.

 

 

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18 thoughts on “Thursday Doors (country doors, wreaths, tech talk, and laundry)

  1. The standard aluminum storm door brought back some memories. I’m pretty sure we had that exact door. The neighbors viewing your laundry are only the tip of the iceberg, if Google earth is updating on laundry day. For a couple of years, our house on Google Earth had a dumpster in the driveway.

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    1. I can almost hear one of those aluminum doors closing and I have seen that one many times – and how fun you had one like it – ha
      and wow – about the dumpster –
      big brother is here baby

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The door with the three windows and the valance brought back childhood memories for me. I love to use our clothesline whenever I can. Especially in spring, for me it’s a reminder that warmer weather is here and winter is gone.
    And gee, even though we have the cheapest electricity in North America I hate to power on something that the sun and the breeze give us for free 😉

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    1. glad to stir up a childhood memory 🙂
      and thinking of the clothesline in spring conjures up beauty and I can feel the breeze

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  3. I echo Norm’s comment. I LOVE it when spring arrives with its warmer weather. There are few things better than climbing exhausted into a bed at night made with clean sheets dried outside.
    Towels on the other hand – I’ll use the dryer, thank you. The rough exfoliation caused by a towel dried outdoors is not quite my thing 😉

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    1. Thanks for chiming in and it seems that there is a common vibe here (and it inspired my Friday Fiction post too)
      ahhhh

      oh and you are right about towels – but I HATE too soft towels – hate it

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      1. Up until yesterday I wouldn’t have understand this comment, but now I’m dealing with towels that are too soft. Yes, I agree, there is such a thing. I would never have guessed.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks – and that was nice to read – and this artist has a few different laundry paintings – all with different moods. But I love how you worded it “caught my breath” cos it had the fresh air feeling – ahhhhh

      Liked by 1 person

  4. There’s something wonderful about seeing a long line of clothes blowing in the wind, for me, anyway. I used to have a washing machine and dryer in my last house but now we have neither. I’ve discovered hand washing and – dare I say it- I actually like it. I wash more frequently so don’t have a pile of laundry to do, like before. I could do with a better way of squeezing the water out of the clothes so I might just buy a mangle, I remember my mother-in-law using one, and she had a family of nine to wash for. The novelty of hand washing may wear off come winter, though. I’ll let you know.

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    1. are you serious – hand washing? Good for you. In the 80s I recall handwashing certain pieces – like when those angora hair sweaters were in – …. but to think you do this – and many health mentors i know would actually say this is good for a workout for you too – the using of the arms and moving the clothes around – and many people forget that all these office jobs rob us of using our bodies and then some folks mistakenly go “cardio crazy” thinking that leads to fitness. But it is “moving often” and doing little jobs that can be the best cross fit ever. And the wringing out could get annoying – especially on the hands and wrists – so I hope you find the right solution. And my grandmother (dad’s side) had one of those washers that had the roller to the side and I used it in 8th grade (Jordache jeans were tough to squeeze through the rollers – but I did it) – 🙂

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  5. I love that painting. That’s beautiful.
    Great topic. I still hang a lot of my wash. Got a retractable line, serves me well. Nothin like sheets off the line. My grandmother did hers even in the dead of winter. I am not that committed .I do not hang the underthings or the pajamas. Ever. LOL I know I could, under the lighter things, but I don’t.

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    1. The retractable line sounds ideal. And I bet the longevity of some clothes is extended – and I can see how your grandmother is set in her ways – just what they did – eh? Our first home was built in 1958 and the first thing we did was take out the huge ugly metal posts for the clothes line- must have been a nice feature in the 50’s – those concreted in posts – would have left them in but they were so uggay.

      🙂

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      1. I would LOVE to have a post line, ugly or not, I miss my old one. The nearby sunny spot I’d put one currently holds an old swing set. We will replace it with a line eventually. Moo sometimes still swings and climbs that set and I want her to enjoy it as long as she can 🙂
        The sun keeps whites white in a way that a dryer cannot, so that’s where I see the longevity you mention.

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