Thursday Doors: Sunflower Wreath, Soft Yellow, and Snap the Whip Kinda Shed….

Hello Readers –

To join in with Norm’s Thursday Doors Photo challenge this week, I have some older doors.

Classic brown, wooden door with sunflower wreath – brick house – rainy day
A rather short door, painted soft yellow to match the window trim- and even a yellow gutter.
Doors on an old red shed (from Belmont, Virginia – June 2019). This little area reminded me of the painting from Homer called Snap the Whip. So I call this the “Snap the Whip kind of shed”  

Did you know that Homer made two versions of Snap the Whip?

 

First version of Snap The Whip (1872) oil painting by Winslow Homer. The painting hows children playing a game called Snap the Whip (or crack the whip) in a field in front of an old red schoolhouse. Snap the whip was a popular children’s game in the 1800s and early 1900s. Children held
hands tightly, ran fast across the field, and the first children in line stop suddenly, yanking the other ones sideways. This caused the ones at the end to break free from the chain. Winning involved being the last person to not get broken from the chain. The painting also became a celebration of innocence and childhood joy – and some suggested it “evoked nostalgia for the nation’s agrarian past.” The striking contrast of the green and red works well with the simple clothes and barefoot children (Read more here).

 

 

Second one Winslow Homer created was this smaller version of Snap The Whip (1872) and he replaced the mountain range with a wide, blue sky (and maybe matches my photo a little better). Snap the Whip was a huge success for Homer and the painting was frequently reproduced. It was also displayed at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, PA.

Math in Art 

Sometimes it is fun to really break down a painting from different angles – or different shapes – like seeing how the elements work together – or how parts of the comp fit certain shapes – like this parallelogram and and a wave from the children. 

 

The comic for today (Thanks again Linda)

 

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Go HERE to Norm 2.0’s blog – to join in or check out the other door shares for this week. 

This is a scheduled post and so I will be back later to link with Norm’s September 5th, 2019 post. 

P R I O R H O U S E

September 2019

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50 thoughts on “Thursday Doors: Sunflower Wreath, Soft Yellow, and Snap the Whip Kinda Shed….

  1. I LOVE the yellow door and window trim shot. And red barns, who doesn’t love a red barn?

    That sunflower wreath seems half done. It needs more sunflowers so that it would totally pop against that red door.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Now that you mention it – that wreath does seem a bit half done – good point!
      And thanks for the feedback on the doors comps this week – fun to read

      Like

  2. Regarding the joke, back in the dark ages (when I was in high school), we had “competencies” we couldn’t graduate without showing that we had basic life skills like balancing a checkbook, reading the want ads in a newspaper, finding things in the yellow pages, and filling out tax forms. I wonder what “competencies” today’s youth would need?

    Liked by 3 people

      1. I agree Stuart – and the requirements today might be how to shop online – how to trip the digital shopping cart by browsing an item for weeks until the price drops and then – click it! Ha

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Great post prior and I love that joke.

    One of the things that’s interested me since I learnt some basic photographic composition is seeing how artist have applied those same basic rules to their work of art. How an image is structured is fascinating.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Stuart – I enjoy learning about how those elements come together too – and so often it is not intentional by the artist – well they just study and train but then they do their own thing (or should – eh?)

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Fun post, I loved the crack the whip picture facts. I learned something new today. Speaking of learning – definitely never use my statistics class knowledge – glad I spent so much time stressing over it in college 😦

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi library lady! Thanks for cinijng in with your feedback 😉
      And I know – all the stress that can come with those “core” classes – and even tho I was having humir here – I do believe learning math and other subjects can offer other perks beside practical use; in fact, I think that some math problems oil the brain and maybe teach ya problem solving skills that apply to life indirectly – ya know ?

      Like

  5. The sunflower wreath really makes me wonder who lives there? I did not know about the two versions of the painting. The game brings back childhood memories. I truly laughed out loud on your ending comic quote, Yvette:)

    Liked by 2 people

  6. That first door is beautiful! And the building too, since you by now know I like brick buildings. But I love the Snap the whip game in that painting! Am wondering where all the joyful paintings went from last century.Ho serious (too much) we have become, and too philosophical in our art! Thank you for your comment about your friend from San Jose!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Thanks for sharing Homer’s artwork and comparing it with the subject of your photo, Yvette. I was previously aware of Homer.
    I always find my knowledge of parallelograms useful too. Not! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Winslow Homer is one of those artists whose landscape with people pieces sorta put me at ease. It’s like his work just wants to be pleasant. Something nice to look at. The darker pieces, I do not care for. Good studies of light, they say, but I feel more like, “Turn on the light, Jeez!” (art with Joey is like that)
    Also, yellow is my fave.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. haha – this comment was great and showed your serious art criticism side that his done in Joey-style
      and less can be more –
      with succinctness and and some folks splash in all these big words – as if that will make there critique better – but Joey – you have that succinctness down
      and so agree with this take on Homer’s work:
      wants to be pleasant. Something nice to look at
      and then….
      yes – same thing with the darkness and areas of light with all that chiaroscuro use of light and shadow
      🙂

      Like

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