Hydrants Post #1 – 2020 Countdown Post dedicated to Blogger BushBoy

Hello Readers – today I have some photos of hydrants to share. Thanks to Cee for her colorful, cracked paint hydrant photo (here) from 2015, which inspired me to grab a few photos of my own over the years. 

 

1) This tucked away hydrant (2016) – is all nestled in – comfortable. “Ahhh, life is okay – all is well with my soul.”  

 

2) This hydrant (2017) has that PROUD and “out there” vibe – ” I am here, I am strong, I am colorful, I am me.”

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3) This hydrant (2018) had a watchman feel. “I am on guard – watching–  and I am here when and if you need me.”
4) This hydrant (2019) is a bit sassy. “I will go wherever I want to go. Middle of the sidewalk? – yep, it is my life and I will do what I want. Just go around me and please don’t let me get in your way.”
5) This hydrant (2019) had that “untended” vibe. “Um, excuse me – could someone please help me close- this is a little embarrassing … anyone?”
6) This hydrant (2016) is a bit on the larger side – or is this from the angle of the shot? Either way – this one seems to say, “I am here with the guys, fitting right in…. et tu?”

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Brief History of the Hydrant (from HERE)

  • First hydrants were likely cauldrons and then faucets. Main challenges with designing hydrants were anti-freezing, hydraulic efficiency, and repairing them as needed.
  • “As late as 1869, the City of Buffalo, NY was still installing wooden case hydrants, according to the first annual report of their public waterworks. But by this time the days of the wooden case hydrant were over. Indeed, by 1865, Philadelphia had installed cast iron hydrants that were very similar to today’s models. Many companies were now making cast iron fire hydrants, and hydrants were deployed in major cities and many smaller ones. Europe, too, was installing such hydrants: Zurich, Switzerland had their first hydrant system in place by 1870. In Asia, the City of Yokohama, Japan, installed their first 131 hydrants in 1887.”
  • That led to three hydrant types: dry barrel, wet barrel, and below ground or flush type.

 

Thanks for dropping by. CLOSING NOTES: 

1) This post is dedicated to our blogging friend, Bushboy – who is enduring the fires in his forest home in Australia. Prayers for him and for all of those impacted by this horrible climatic event.

2) Blogging friend, Equinoxio21, has two HYDRANT POSTS worth checking out:

First – this one has 12 really diverse hydrants and an artist’s sketch:  https://equinoxio21.wordpress.com/2017/08/22/hydrants-evil-or/

And this post has ten hydrants – with a “ready to hatch” pile of them – ha! and a firefighter sculpture:  https://equinoxio21.wordpress.com/2018/03/05/breaking-news-hydrants-invade-asia/


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51 thoughts on “Hydrants Post #1 – 2020 Countdown Post dedicated to Blogger BushBoy

  1. I had to chuckle at the hydrant in front of the tattoo parlor! Looks like it has its own tattoo to fit in with the guys! LOL!
    I guess I sort of had my head in the sand as I didn’t know about the fires in Australia. Prayers go out for the safety of all those affected.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve learned a lot from this, Yvette! And the photos are great. They all reminded me of little people out on their own doing their own thing. How can a hydrant look cute? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Alli – I got the same feeling with the little
      People – especially the one with color – looks like he has little Red arms and is ready to
      Embrace with a hug! Ha
      And honored to share any tidbit with a master historian – 🙏

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh bless you – I’ve never been called that before! You’ve made my year now! Thanks so much! And I’m glad it wasn’t just me who wanted to embrace the hydrants! I’m with you on the colour. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for sharing the hydrant photos. They reminded me of my hometown, where there was an older woman who used to set up a camp chair and paint characters’ faces and bodies on all the fire hydrants. I can remember she painted one like Uncle Sam, one like a nutcracker, and one like Winnie the Pooh. There were many others, but I don’t remember all of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I love your sense of humor with the hydrants. Great shots! I’m touched by your callout for wishes for the safe well-being of Brian and the others living near the fires in Australia.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Another great post Yvette – and what fun. What I want to know is though, did you like all good wildlife photographers, leave it as you saw it, or did you take pity on the poor Hydrant with the unscrewed cap and put it back on? (I know what I would have done :-D)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Stuart- hahaha – good question and I left it alone – partly because it was a construction site and so they might have been using it a lot that day or that week.
      And the funny thing is I saw a few more hydrants (different places) with that same small cap Off – so it must be one that is easier to leave off if using in a certain way.
      Well…
      Whatever but I think you know what I mean.
      Thanks For taking the time to say hello – please enjoy your blog pause and happy holidays

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I remember when fire hydrants were all red. I like the varying colors I see these days. Obviously we want easily visible hydrants to hasten firemen/persons? to their locations when a fire is burning, but other colors are bright as well.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

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