Thursday Doors: Bums in the Attic Excerpt & Video snippet with author Sandra Cisneros’

Time for Thursday Doors and my photos for today, well as I looked at them- they reminded me of Sandra Cisneros’ Bums in the Attic snippet from her novel The House on Mango street 

 

Bums in the Attic

Excerpt from The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

     I want a house on a hill like the ones with the gardens where Papa works. We go on Sundays, Pap’s day of. I used to go. I don’t anymore. You don’t like to go out with us, Papa says. Getting too old? Getting too stuck-up, says Nenny. I don’t tell them I’m ashamed—all of us staring out the window like we’re hungry. I am tired of looking at what we can’t have. When we win the lottery… Mama begins, and then I stop listening.

People who live on hills sleep so close to the stars they forget those of us who live too much on earth. They don’t look down at all except to be content to live on hills. They have nothing to do with last week’s garbage or fear of rats. Night comes. Nothing wakes them but the wind.

One day I’ll own my own house, but I won’t forget who I am or where I cam from. Passing bums will ask, Can I come in? I’ll offer them the attic, ask them to stay, because I know how it is to be without a house.

Some days after dinner, guests and I will sit in front of a fire. Floorboards will squeak upstairs. The attic grumble.

Rats? they’ll ask.

Bums, I’ll say, and I’ll be happy.

The House on Mango Street (1984) is a novel by author Sandra Cisneros. This Mexican-American author tells the story of Esperanza Cordero, a 12-year-old “Chicana girl” growing up in the Hispanic quarter of Chicago. Her writing highlights adapting to culture as she has little snippets that tug at our heart.

Interview with author Sandra Cisneros about her inspiration for “The House On Mango Street”

 

If you want to join in with Thursday Doors -go to Dan’s Blog for info: https://nofacilities.com/2021/02/25/waterbury-doors-thursdaydoors/

..

.

.

.

.


34 thoughts on “Thursday Doors: Bums in the Attic Excerpt & Video snippet with author Sandra Cisneros’

  1. Some very nice doors and a wonderful little snippet. Thanks for joining us Yvette and thnaks for introducing us to “The House on Mango Street”

    Like

    1. i like that part too
      and this author has some very natural talent – i feel like some authors have to grind and grow – some authors are always average (harsh but true) and then some authors really have a special gift and i feel that with Cisneros’ early work
      and Hedy –
      hope you are having a great day too
      we have sunshine ☀️

      Like

    1. hi Jean
      thanks for reading and seeing i only had two photos for today – i thought for a minute what to maybe add (even tho two photos sometimes stand alone fine and make for a njce post) but then Cisneros came to mind because i saw an interview where she was saying she painted her house bright colors and challenges the Homeowner’s Association and WON to keep them
      but i could not find that video and went with this one –
      glad it fit
      ☀️☀️

      Liked by 1 person

    1. thanks frank – and this author – Cisneros – actually has a more recent book -about a house of her own that is a memoir and she once shared about painting her house in bright Mexican colors and how she fought to keep the colors
      so all that to say – the photos reminded me of this author for a few reasons
      and really enjoyed your Doors Beach Walk – i only skimmed it but plan to come back later to read more and see the video on doors of italy!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. my pleasure and as much as i like houses like these – they are not my preference to live in. i know some folks love the old drafty vibe and built ins and history and glad they enjoy it
      ☀️😊

      Liked by 1 person

  2. What a heart-wrenching snippet but one to set a person thinking. It reminds me of when we lived in Cleveland and the area downtown near the Cleveland Clinic was very run down. The city gave big tax breaks to people who would move and build there and soon there were very grand houses all along the street and the Clinic bought up lots of land for itself. Go a few blocks away and there was still poverty. And where did all the poor people go? Most of them probably didn’t own their house and certainly not a house made into an apartment, so they didn’t get a bundle from the sale so they could live better. I love to read about athletes or others who “made it big” who buy their family a house or help the poor children get a better education or…. They haven’t forgotten where they came from. But not all of us came from such a place and snippets like this can help us “remember” and see what we can do.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. janet – that was beautiful and that gentrification around the Cleveland clinic is happening in a few areas i know if and a lot of people protest for good reason
      – and this author layers so much social psychology and culture into her writing – your reflection on Bums in the attic helped me see even more tidbits layered there!
      and the word “bums” is interesting and not sure if it is PC anymore – and reminds me of an episode of Monk – “Mr Monk and the miracle” where “Bums make their own gravy”
      anyhow – hope you have a nice day

      Liked by 1 person

  3. The House on Mango Street is a book that has been on my TBR list forever. I think this reminder may be what I need to finally crack it open. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. “The House on Mango Street” is a long time favorite. I remember the author’s purple house. Absolutely charming. The stuffed shirts in King William didn’t. I think they eventually compromised though.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. ahhhh – J-Dub’ the author’s purple house interview was originally what i was looking to share but could not find it (only had so much time to draft the post and went with the “inspiration about the house” video – and cheers to Sandra Cisneros for her bold move to paint her house in colors (live out loud) and advocate for celebrating our culture within the bigger umbrella culture
      – thanks for the nice comment

      Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.