Body Food, Mind Food (Lens-Artists & Mahesh Nair’s book Chaotic Alleys)

The Lens-Artists Photo Challenge theme is “One Photo, Two Ways”.

I decided to feature some throwback photos to go down memory lane and introduce you to Mahesh Nair’s book release. I have TWO free hard copies to give away – so be sure to check out the end of this post. 

Let’s start with a photo of my mother-n-law’s bookshelf. It has personality and maybe even has a 1980’s vibe?

lens same pic book shelf
This photo of my mother-n-law’s bookshelf reminded me how everyone’s bookshelves have different personalities. Some of you only have e-books these days and so your device has a bookshelf. Anyhow,  I found an old blog comment from Ericka/Erica, and she noted the desire to read books 24/7 (ha) –  which reminded me about how books FEED our mind and soul.  There are times we can skim sites, pdfs, booklets, or even meaty blog posts – but other times there is nothing like a good book. A good book can feed the soul in a special way – it allows for skimming or for an immersion. And Trent recently shared about his “reading hangover” after a serious immersion in Little Dorrit – and so my point is that…. at times…. there is nothing like a good book to nourish a part of our human essence. 

Next up, I actually took this “shoe on the beach” photo to possibly write about it someday. A future idea for micro fiction perhaps? And for some of us, we are fed by taking photos and then writing about them.

lens-same pic- shoe on beach
Can you feel a story here? The lost shoe.. The found shoe…. how did it end up here?

On a different visit to Florida, we made some time for a fun photo opportunity.

lens same pic key west - pose
I had to crouch down to fit with the dress prop. And this was all about the smile. This post today has the theme of feeding the mind and body – and let us NOT forget that humor nourishes our mind and body – and laughter helps us heal – Check out Norman Cousins Laughter Cure story here

Also flashing back with this Sandwhch Cubano. Mmmmm – In the second photo of this tasty sandwich for the lens-artist’s theme, I tried to quiet down the fires and show the sandwich more, but I think I like the top photo better?

 

lens same pic snadwich cubano
This is food for the body, which then feeds the brain and helps us live.  Did you know a few years ago – maybe 2017 – I was following bloggers- dale and Sorryless (here)– who were sampling and reviewing Cubano sandwiches – their fun shares led me to a Cubano quest.  We still stay on the lookout for a good Cubano. 

 

This next photo is a throwback from 2016. Some readers might remember when our dog, Cody, passed away that year.  One of the reasons it was initially so tough was because it was a surprise. It is much different when one is prepared fora dog to pass away, but this was a total surprise.  Anyhow, it was through that grieving experience that I met bushboy (he let me use a photo oh his and BB is such a cool guy) – and  then Mahesh (here) checked on me every day the first week. It was a steady stream of support. (Many thanks, M.)

lens same pic book shelf mahesh
I was getting ready for a small group and made these little design name cards to pass the time. Sometimes doodling can be so therapeutic with that indirect attention engagement.  These little name cards helped me process the initial loss – I also went with my spouse wherever he went for the first few days – and just kind of stayed busy. 
chaotic alleys mahesh nair book
Chaotic Alleys: Collected Works is a fiction compilation of micro, flash, and short stories published, shortlisted, long-listed, and anthologized in journals and magazines.

 I have been connecting with Mahesh Nair (as authors) since 2014 and when I heard about his book release I was excited.  I had the chance to do an early review of the book and I ws delighted to see familiar selections as well as read some that were new to me. If you are looking for a book to add to your summer reading list, consider this one. The sections are short (not like the lengthy books of Dickens’ Little Dorrit and T Harry Willaims’ Huey Long).

Instead, this book from Nair offers short works of fiction that allow you to skim, read a few times, or delve deeper and make connections. For those that appreciate short fiction, you will also enjoy the way each word is hand picked and each sentence is mulled over.  

Recently, ally bean (here) wrote about “Purple Prose” writing – that kind of verbose and rambling writing that is inhospitable, loquacious, tiring, and over stimulating. This book from Mahesh Nair is opposite of purple prose- because each selection has been carefully executed with words and thoughts. In Chaotic Alleys, we see Nair’s structured (without chaos) short vignettes about life, culture, pain, thinking, and living. 

cahotic alleys mahesh nair book 2
Priorhouse quick review: Chaotic Alleys offers the reader well-executed selections by a writer who carefully placed each word and idea.  Some of the selections stick with you, almost like you have a brick in your pocket and you walk away pondering. A little bit of weight stays there with you and this author gets you thinking – about life, about people, and about culture.  Nair aims to wake people up while using his unique voice and careful word choice to offer us a signature style in each story.

Mahesh Nair’s book seemed a perfect closing for today’s post with “One photo, two ways” because each of his short selections offers different takeaways: “One story, multiple takes”  – which also gives us mind food to help us “live life to its full.” If you want to be in the raffle for one of the hard copies, let me know in a comment. HIs book is also available on Kindle.

Body food. Mind food. Let’s stay nourished folks!

 

 

Thanks for your visit today.

Care to join in with the Lens-Artists?
and the other main hosts:

 

Amy of https://shareandconnect.wordpress.com/

Patti of https://pilotfishblog.com/

Ann-Christine (Leya) of https://lagottocattleya.wordpress.com/

 

 

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47 thoughts on “Body Food, Mind Food (Lens-Artists & Mahesh Nair’s book Chaotic Alleys)

  1. What a wonderful post with lots of info! I love how the bookshelves have personalities! they truly do, and how can you not love books. The written word and there’s so many wonderfully written words out there!! I’ll check out the links you provided. I loved the photos of you in Florida! Fun photos!! 💜🤩

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks D! And reading your comment reminded me that during the Pandemic when so many people were doing interviews from their homes – we were able to see some slivers of bookshelves – usually kitchens or living rooms – but sometimes we could see some books and it was fun to see what folks were reading 😉

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Tina and I wasn’t sure what to do for the photo edits – and I have really enjoyed seeing so many different approaches to your idea this week

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have bookshelves and book boxes, the latter in the garage. 🙂 Although I love real books, what a blessing e-books have been during the pandemic. Interestingly, I’ve found it easier to get real books because so many people are waiting for e-books. I just like to read, so I don’t mine either format. I also enjoyed the shots in Florida.

    janet

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    1. Hi Janet – thanks for sharing that about the book boxes! Seems a smart way to keep them while not having to have walls of bookshelves
      And I did not realize ebooks were being waited for during the pandemic – hmmm –

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Some popular authors’ new books have waits of 6 month or more for the e-book. 🙂 I have no choice about keeping books in boxes as I don’t have nearly enough shelf space. The problem is that I forget they’re there or where a book is and don’t think about them.

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        1. Yes – that is a slight problem because if you forget about something or don’t know where it is – well we get robbed of enjoying it. Hmmmm – maybe labeling the boxes can help – but I guess it depends on how many books there are in a box

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  3. As the late, great Dick Enberg might say . . . Yvette, you touched ’em all! Truly a home run of a post, with a little Cubano yum tucked in the middle. Can’t ask for more than that.

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    1. Hi – I did not mean to put the sandwich in the middle but now I am Glad it ended up there – and hope you ha e a good week and end of June (hard to believe it is almost July

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Thanks a lot, Prior, for reviewing and sharing Chaotic Alleys. I’m humbled and honored. I wanted most of my published stories together in a compilation and I’m so grateful you agreed to be a part of the book. The strong vibe that your mother-in-law’s bookshelf gives will stay with me. And the lost shoe – wow I can feel it – has pain, fear, anxiety, or perhaps only happiness.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Mahesh – I am glad the bookshelf was an image that will stay with yin and that it fit well into this post- – I originally planned on sharing about your book later in summer but the mood felt write – I mean – right – for the write-mite! I might need to move on with my comment
      And I imagine a pretty lady wearing a dress of similar colors – green and gold perhaps – and her long black hair softly moves in the wind on her tan skin and she doesn’t miss either of her shoes because she kicked them off the boat the night before –

      Hahah
      Okay – wishing you a good week ahead and be in touch soon

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I agree with you that bookshelves have personalities. A few years back there was an interior design trend that encouraged people to make monotone book covers for all their books. The idea was you’d put all your books wrapped in the same color on your shelves– and it would create an uncluttered minimalist style. This trend bugged me to no end. It seemed like you were stifling yourself, instead of being interesting– in your own home. WHY?

    Thanks for the link, too. I appreciate it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That does sound really stifling and I have not heard of the trend – glad I missed it- and that would especially be a shame for some artsy book covers (like Mahesh’s recent release)

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  6. This post was shock full of fun Yvette and your mother in law’S BOOK shelf looks like my moms. And now I’m hungry with that mouth watering sandwhich.
    Lovely book review too💖💖💖💖

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Wish we could share food via blogs – just virtual
      And as a writer and poet – I know you would appreciate mahesh’s attention to every detail – reminds me of when we were talking about photos and quick clicks or how some take careful shots – I think in writing it can be similar – some authors pour out content like a fast shutter clicking and others carefully craft a micro fiction piece like a detailed photo shoot 📸📘

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      1. Oh I love that idea. I so much agree. My darn photos are always blurry but yours are awesome. I do think you’re so right about the similarities in writing. 💖💖🤗🤗

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  7. Hi Yvette – great selections for the prompt. I can’t really pick favorites as each pairing highlighted something intriguing. So fun that you sprinkled the post with memories too – and fun blogging friends you’ve met along the way. Thanks for all the kindness and encouragement you share in your posts!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Shelley – today’s post was one of those unplanned ones that came together when I heard tina’s theme – i rogibalky was going to post today about the lynard skynard “cover band” we saw last weekend – but those pics will be shared another time –
      And as you know – I appreciate your visit and comments – 😊☀️📘

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  8. There is a story behind those sandals. A story we can only imagine. Was it lost at sea while feet dangled over the side of a yacht? Was it lost in the surf as the owner lay sleeping on the beach? Or did it fall off when the owner ran quickly away from some unknown danger?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. You describe well, Yvette, the feelings when reading a good book. I am curious about Trent’s “reading hangover.” The piece de resistance is how “…there is nothing like a good book to nourish a part of our human essence.”

    Your mother-in-law’s bookcase does have a 1980’s vibe. Seeing this saddens me a little since over the past few decades I have been encouraged to minimize and simplify, which means giving away many books. Especially when these books have changed my life. Either because of the content or how I escaped into them.

    I am with you and wonder about the shoe left behind. Very creative and fun how you played with the photos and the concept of ‘food.’

    I also enjoyed Ally Bean’s post about “Purple Prose.” Initially a new concept for me, and of course, now I have seen this phrase pop out at me throughout the week.

    Thank you for sharing a very meaty, layered, interesting and creative post. I will bookmark and read more about some of the writers you include here. Yes, please place me in the raffle. Mahesh Nair’s book sounds great.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi
      I have one Chaotic Alkeys book left to gift and it is all for you amiga

      And Trent said he had a hangover because he read almost 500 pages I two days (something like that ) because we both crammed to finish the book (a fun little challenge idea that we ran with)
      And thanks for checking out this post because as noted -the comment I found from you from a January post was in my mind and even though it might be too long for some folks (especially those who like to post a single photo or a quote – so for those folks they can just skim and go- ha!
      Oh and lastly
      At some point we all need to release our books 📚 and paper books take up space – I am down to two bookshelves and have one area that can hold about a dozen more books – but I am not going to fill that space – unless really special books

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Hi Yvette, A treat about “Chaotic Alleys!” Is this an ebook or hard copy? Can I get some $$ to you for mailing? We can privately communicate through email or contact page. No rush, of course. Happy July 4th. ✨

        Liked by 1 person

  10. You packed a lot of punch into this post, Yvette. I enjoyed your experimental work with the pictures. I loved the cutout people portraits. I also loved how your blogging friends gathered around you when you lost your dog. That is probably the hardest animal to lose. They share everything with you. Great book review, too. Have a great week. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Marsha
      Thanks for the feedback – and I hindsight I see more about the support I felt from the blog world – in the early days it would ha e been a little
      Too much of everyone was helping – and so when Mahesh was following up (outside of the blog medium) it was the right balance (if that makes sense)
      And hope your weekend is going well – be over to see you soon

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I get that. There are so many facets to blogging, both technical, literary, and photographically. It’s a genre itself. Then it is also a community, and like any community, it takes a while to make friends and gain colleagues. 🙂

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    1. Hi Renee – the lost shoe has my gears turning too – and I recently photographed a lost colorful flip flop – and it made me realize that another reason I like the shoe in this post is how it blends in with the color of the sand and seaweed
      ☀️☀️

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  11. I like the idea of food for the body and the mind. That’s a cute and creative photo op and I thought, (just before reading you had to crouch down) “I never noticed Yvette was that short next to her husband before.” Gee, that Cuban sandwich and fries looks wonderful. They are calling my name. I really like the photo of the sandal on the beach looking worn and forlorn. You have to wonder what happened there – was the owner running to catch up with a long-lost acquaintance spotted up ahead on the beach, or did she lose it while sprinting after a pooch that has suddenly misbehaved and taken off when he was just walking companionably next to her. We’ll never know, but, like the lady looking in the store window, we can only speculate.

    Liked by 1 person

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