Earth Story (26MARCH2022 Lens-Artist’s Photo Challenge #192)

Hello readers, this week the Lens-Artist theme is Earth Story. Amy invites us to share about the earth from our lens. 

Starting with photos that remind us that humans are part of the earth story. 

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Now a little section from Bleak House (reading along slowly for the 2022 #Dickenschallenge – here and here) and so this section stood out today as Dickens depicted the vibrancy in the earth’s fruits: 

     “He lived in a pretty house, formerly the parsonage house, with a lawn in front, a bright flower-garden at the side, and a well-stocked orchard and kitchen-garden in the rear, enclosed with a venerable wall that had of itself a ripened ruddy look. But, indeed, everything about the place wore an aspect of maturity and abundance. The old lime-tree walk was like green cloisters, the very shadows of the cherry-trees and apple-trees were heavy with fruit, the gooseberry-bushes were so laden that their branches arched and rested on the earth, the strawberries and raspberries grew in like profusion, and the peaches basked by the hundred on the wall.

     Tumbled about among the spread nets and the glass frames sparkling and winking in the sun there were such heaps of drooping pods, and marrows, and cucumbers, that every foot of ground appeared a vegetable treasury, while the smell of sweet herbs and all kinds of wholesome growth (to say nothing of the neighbouring meadows where the hay was carrying) made the whole air a great nosegay. Such stillness and composure reigned within the orderly precincts of the old red wall that even the feathers hung in garlands to scare the birds hardly stirred; and the wall had such a ripening influence that where, here and there high up, a disused nail and scrap of list still clung to it, it was easy to fancy that they had mellowed with the changing seasons and that they had rusted and decayed according to the common fate.”

                             ~Charles Dickens in Bleak House: CHAPTER XVIII, Lady Dedlock

 

The last photo for today has a little story to go with it.

  • Do you see the little flowers below? They are called ‘Jumping Jack’ Perennial Viola. I brought home one little transplant back in the spring of 2009. They were near the art room that I taught in back then. The transplant was wrapped in a wet napkin and made the journey just fine. 
  • The little violas have come back every year since then; however, this year they are five times the normal amount. Perhaps a little too much, but they are so beautiful and these small, cold-weather flowers bloom in late winter and early spring, bringing a little cheer (like the daffodils).
  • Also, it never fails, each year, when I see those first viola blooms emerge, I am reminded of my own story (on this earth) as I think of that season in my life (who I was then and what my aims were – I was teaching art and it was such a passion at the time…).
  • Anyhow, each year, I have different memories unfold when I see the violas emerge – the memories come and go quickly – and I smile for them.  
  • So… I guess these little “jumping jacks” are a bit of a memory flower.

 

 

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67 thoughts on “Earth Story (26MARCH2022 Lens-Artist’s Photo Challenge #192)

  1. Such a beautiful post Yvette. I enjoyed the Charles Dickens story, the descriptions of the gardens are so fantastic, it felt as if I walked there myself. You’re earth story is precious too and the flowers are so beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jumping Jack Flash of memory? Sorry, had to get the ‘Stones in there some how 😉 Cool story about the violas, though. I like your quote from Bleak House as well. And, of course, the photos of Man and Earth.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Trent
      Thanks for the song to start my day!
      That is about a bad tune to have in the mind 🎶and fit so well- hahahaha
      And cheers to your finishing bleak house early !

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes – and “Angie” might not “Get no satisfaction” but she’ll get what she needs…. because if you try sometimes –
          You just might find…..
          🎶🎶

          Liked by 1 person

        2. It might come to my emotional rescue, but I can’t no satisfaction, so I’ll paint it black… Maybe a strong coffee with some brown sugar would start me up

          Liked by 1 person

        3. lol, I think if I push it too far I might start getting in trouble… they are rock’s bad boys, after all. Oh well, on that note, goodbye, Ruby Tuesday 😉

          Like

        4. hahahah – love that ruby Tuesday ending but “Wild horses couldn’t drag me away” from our chatting –
          or maybe they could….but now I need to gimme shelter (okay – that was bad)

          Liked by 1 person

        5. lol, I’m sure we can keep this going for a while, in fact, I was about to say Let’s Spend the Night Together trading Stone’s songs, but it might be misinterpreted 😉 Maybe it’s time to stop.. and start on Bob Dylan, because, well, sometimes you feel Like a Rolling Stone…

          Like

  3. Loved reading Bleak House though haven’t read Dickens at all for a while. The Jumping Jacks are lovely – a bit like our wild pansy Viola tricolor -also known as heartsease – which I find so comforting! I love these little flowers and managed to grow one from seed last year. Hope to get them to spread around my little garden!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Heartsease is such a good name and fits what sounds like a delightful flower and hoe extra cool you managed to grow it from seed.
      I have mixed success with starting from seeds – and only once has parsley worked for me from seed – and it was when I found a packet – in my yard – (another perk of the urban garden) and it was a ten cent pack of soaked parsley seeds –
      Decided to add them to a container and Parsley grew all
      Summer – but other than that I can’t get parsley to succeed from seed and I buy a started one
      😉
      🌿

      Like

  4. The photo of the path bending through the trees made me hold my breath it is so like one I have photographed here on a regular walk. Then I began to see all the differences – also good!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Maria – I would love to see your path so I can compare too. And that photo is from last November and one of my goals was to make sure I had a few photos of pathways – maybe for writing prompts – 😉 but this one made it here.

      Like

  5. Each photo tell the story that humas are part of the earth story. I love how Dickens described the garden… Thank you for sharing the quote. Perennial Viola has a lot of stories to tell.
    Thank you, Yvette for this beautiful post. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi – I look forward to hearing your thoughts on it because I so enjoyed your post on A Christmas Carol

      Hope you are having a nice weekend

      Like

        1. Hi Jim – well it is not hard to imagine because I know a lot of folks who have never watched it. And know soon that have tried and could not “get into it” – and Might have missed the snag (or hook) if Started at season one. Instead, I heard the hype and happened to start at a good episode. But not every show will fit everyone. And you know how recently the “inventing Anna” came up in our exchange – well I tried a second time to watch that show and it is painful for me. Nothing against Shonda Rhimes (and she has had her share dod success in the producing and writing) but I personally do not like her wiring and her themes. Gray’s anatomy was just as painful – tried to watch it with my step-daughter and the sophomoric characters with their shallow lives annoyed (maybe Lauren Greenfields’ “Generation Wealth” documentary would support a lot of truth Rhimes actually depicts in her story lines – or….. do shows like the ones from Rhimes fuel the shallow existence many have that Greenfield highlights in her brilliant documentary about some aspects of current US culture).
          so to sum up…
          breaking bad is truly not for everyone and Jim, it seems like you have a good pace with the shows you do tackle.
          🙂

          Like

  6. What a fun post Yvette! I really loved your little memory flower story – it makes perfect sense. How terrific for you to have those annual special moments of memory. While I don’t have a memory flower I know that each of our major flower blooms (first camellia, then azalea, then magnolia) remind me of the arrival and the passage of spring which always me smile. Does that count?! 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tina – that does count and it really seems to fit the photographer in you- to know seasons and the unfolding pattern!!
      And early on my “jumping jack” memories were “sometimes” of small regrets (like that woulda shoulda coulda mentality crap that can creep in – like a weed it can spread and rob the joy)- but nowadays the quick snapshot memories have that learned contentment and I guess seasoned appreciation.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for sharing your favorite one from this post – that up view is from a concert path along the James river – and when you look up we often see things like that – the bricks – the green and the gates…
      Wishing you a good day….E

      Like

  7. Yes indeed, humans are a part of this story. Isn’t it unique to see interpretations from land to sea to air, and “next door” when talking of our stories? I especially loved How your viola generate a memory for you. ( I took some hosta from my husbands grammas home in the early 80’s and brought pieces to all the homes we lived in ( well excluding Yellowstone and Arizona) including my in laws. Spreading the love. Donna

    Like

    1. Hi Donna! I had hosta from
      My neighbor and it lasted for years –
      And every time I saw those lined leaves (variegated) I smiled to think of their sharing.
      And so imagining your transplants of hosta going to so many places is very fun!
      And would hosta make it in Arizona? Hmmm
      //
      Oh And – you are so right — the different “wary stories” this week have been enjoyable –

      Liked by 1 person

  8. The garden described in Bleak House sounds wonderful.

    Johnny Jump Ups! That’s what we called them. I haven’t seen any for years and years. When I lived in the Bay Area there was a place I would go each spring to look for wildflowers and when I found this one the first time there I had no idea what it was but got it ID’d pretty quickly at the Ranger’s visitor’s center. After that year I always looked for them there.

    Thank you jogging my memory about them. I’m still smiling! 😀

    Like

    1. hello= I am glad that my “memory flower” triggered a bit of a memory for you. And I think I have heard of the Johnny jump ups–
      I hope you maybe have some again in your garden someday (if that is what you want) – a
      and my neighbor’s have had a few these meander their way over the years – but not many – and this year was the most I have ever
      seen in my small garden plots.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. They’re pretty and perky – I like them Yvette. I had some bare spots in the backyard so I bought some seed packets of Forget-Me-Nots. I looked at the picture on the packet and thought the light blue flowers would complement the blue siding perfectly. I sprinkled them around and watered them – no special fertilizer/blooming food, etc. and they took off and soon were gangly and messy looking. I didn’t think they’d survive a Michigan Winter – I was NOT looking for them to return as a matter of fact, but there they are, every year, growing taller and taller. Usually before they are spent, I am yanking them out by the handfuls or they’d take over the yard!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh they sound very invasive and it is a mixed thing with flowers like that – one one hand so easy and beautiful but then on the other hand the invasive side and tangled vibe has its angle

      Cheers to finding what works for us at different times

      Liked by 1 person

  10. A totally lovely and inspiring post. I too love little violas, and they grow in my garden too. The” Bleak House” read is a treat – I walk there with him…and you. He was good at details, Dickens. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

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