Brief Review of “A Quiet Passion” (Emily Dickinson Movie)

Hello Readers,

I should be finishing the Bleak House book (because the #DickensChallenge ends June 9th – more info here and here) and I should be writing a short story for the Thursday Doors May Challenge (here) – but last week, I became pleasantly sidetracked with Emily Dickinson poetry. And then – yes! – I  finally finished watching A Quiet Passion (2016-2017), the film by Terence Davies about the life of Emily Dickinson.  

Back in May 2019, I posted a lot about Emily Dickinson (as I promoted a book) and with that in mind, I decided that May 2022 needed a little bit of Dickinson. So here is my review of the movie and some thoughts about this wonderful poet. 

  • I give the movie, A Quiet Passion, a “D” for the screenplay and scene progression, a “B+” for the acting, and an “F” for Emily depiction  – because I think that Davies, the writer/director, inaccurately depicted the Emily Dickinson we get to know from her 1,775 poems. Instead, Davies provided a limited (biased) view and showed us an Emily with symptoms of a mood disorder, someone who was miserable and the Dickinson family seemed to be an early version of the Adams Family.
  • If you want to read an excellent review about A Quiet Passion – go here – to see Erin Blackwell’s (Bay Area reporter) take on this disappointing movie. I am glad I did not read her review first or I might NOT have watched the film at all. Oh, and I agree with Blackwell as she noted how the scenes moved so slow it forced us to scrutinize the actor’s teeth and nitpick other details.
  • The writer of A Quiet Passion, Terence Davies, seems to have forgotten that Emily, a huge nature lover, wrote outdoors very often and had many sublime moments in her yard. Many of her poems were inspired from nature and this American poet had delight in her steps on MANY days.  She had joy!  But this was missed completely.
  • Instead of showing Emily outside, and getting lost in nature, or reading under a blue sky on various parts of the homestead, where so many poems likely were birthed and developed, the film had Emily indoors the entire time.
  • The film also had Emily far too pathological. Far too angry. I doubt Emily Dickinson was bickering and raising her voice as much as Cynthia’s Nixon’s character was forced to do. The intensity of the mild shouting was heavy. The dark arguing scenes were too much and felt off. 
  • Emily Dickinson was depicted in A Quiet Passion as a melancholic, moody and sometimes mildly manic, quarrelsome, depressed, and as a loco woman. Indeed, she likely had a few meltdowns (grin with that because that can be quite normal –  to have a meltdown now and again – especially for the artistic types). And sure, she pulled back from societal roles – and living in that mid-to-late 1800s era – many of us might have done the same darn thing – with the social funk, head games, and oppression on women and minorities. Many folks even pull back now – but we just don’t know it because they are NOT on social media (ha).  Or they pull back as natural “home bodies” with much contentment! And here is the thing – it was later in her life when Emily stayed inside more and more, which might have been connected to her kidney problems/health issues. And even with staying inside – it doesn’t mean she was so angry and “biting” all the time. Rather, the simple life SHE CHOSE to lead was one of quietude! It was related to celebrating introversion, which doesn’t mean cray-cray.  
  • Emily’s contented life, even if not perfect and not all bliss, was about embracing each day with an intentionally quiet life and not forcing oneself into any prescribed social role. Emily chose to assume the role of a poet. Stubborn but focused. Perhaps we would say she never got caught up in the rat race of that culture.
  • Emily also often baked and for anyone who has explored time in the kitchen – they would know that Davies missed out on creating some joyful scenes in Emily’s life that maybe connected with baking flops, some successes, experimenting and tasting flavors, and then gifting various items (because Emily also gave a lot of food away), reminding us that introverts are not anti-social – they have a different way of connecting. Emily socially connected in her own ways.
  • Also, Emily Dickinson did greet guests from the upstairs without coming down -which I take as refusing to put on her social hat – or might have stayed on the perimeter of a social gathering (sigh – have you ever felt the need to do that too? And for a funeral – well some folks just don’t “do funerals”) – but to have the movie keep Emily indoors the ENTIRE TIME WAS A MISTAKE. The script did include Emily “mentioning” that she only stayed on the family homestead – but they never brought her outside in the film.
    Emily enjoyed the family’s large homestead and was outside often. She wrote about the joy of birds, had a favorite tree, etc – but all of this was left out.

    • For the movie to have such a depressed depiction of Emily Dickinson gave an incomplete picture and you wondered if Davies was mistakenly thinking of the lightly tormented Sylvia Plath. It was as if this screenwriter only used 40 of Emily’s 1,775 poems to anchor the script. Emily was NOT agoraphobic and she delighted in her yard. Also, she likely smiled and laughed a lot; however, she was depicted as an angry, manic, weird, and as an embittered woman. She might have had some embitterment settle in as the years passed, but she still had this ongoing peace that was brilliantly revealed in all of her poetry. The words she penned revealed her peacefulness, wisdom, acceptance, insight, faith and questions about faith, and it revealed her healthy cognitive churning about societal and humanity issues.
    • If you want to know Emily, just dig through her many poems. For example – here is one she wrote about a bird:   Poem #880
      The Bird must sing to earn the Crumb
      What merit have the Tune
      No Breakfast if it guaranty
      The Rose content may bloom
      To gain renown of Lady’s Drawer
      But if the Lady come
      But once a Century, the Rose
      Superfluous become— 
  • The poetry read aloud in the movie was brilliantly added. That was a highlight.
    The poetry was read during certain scenes and Cynthia Nixon’s talent was obvious. The way the poems were read aloud helped us to feel some of the ideas and emotions that Emily poured into her work. For example, in the film, Dickinson verbally recited “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” to her newborn nephew, Ned. However, This reading did not feel realistic. Also, that is where some of the creepiness of this movie also reared its head. As the family looked on during this oration, their over-the-top creepy smiles and watery eyes were too much for the scene. Also, it was not realistic because rarely does one recite a poem like that – while holding an infant for the first time – and rarely would such prose be quickly understood and received with such amazement – esp. from family members.
  • My son watched part of A Quiet Passion with me (it took me three sittings to get through this two hour+ movie). We had a chance to briefly talk about Wadsworth (a bonus to have chat time with son). In Denver, Colorado – Wadsworth Boulevard was right near our first home and so we talked about that and then had a slight chat about the Wadsworth that Emily admired.
  • I feel Davies also got the Wadsworth area wrong in the film. Instead of showing Emily’s healthy admiration for Wadsworth – they made it creepy where she awkwardly handed him a poem. Even if that was accurate, and I doubt it was, they missed the friendship that was reciprocated.
  • Instead of showing the way these two, Wadsworth and Dickinson, had a little flirting – with a very deep soul connection – intellectual sharing – and real friendship – Davies gave us scenes that made Emily seem like a predator and even a bit creepy. He missed harvesting data from their exchange of letters. 
  • Even though the poetry that was read in the movie was well done (artsy and understandable) and the costumes were pretty good, the movie FAILED to show us how this woman was fueled (and soothed) by her writing. The movie showed her as moody, insecure, and a little loco.
  • The movie also left out the part where the family found all of Emily’s poems after she died – they were tucked away in a dresser. To leave that discovery out was to miss ANOTHER important detail. 
  • The author missed the essence of Emily Dickinson. His view of her seemed to be based on only a few of her poems. They could have had Emily’s older sister (played by the awesome Jennifer Ehle, Pride and Prejudice, 1995) find the poems and celebrate the discovery.
  • Emily Dickinson used her poetry to pull back to ponder life, which helped her passionately live in her own Thoreau-like contented way (I almost wrote Thorogood-like there – hahah – you know, George Thorogood, the rock-star musician… “who drinks alone”….?) Anyhow, Emily’s life path was quite similar to Henry David Thoreau’s contented alternative path: they both found peace and ecstasy in nature and in writing. They both often connected with God in special ways that HAD to go beyond church walls as they pulled away from religiosity.
  • So…. sadly, the script for the movie A Quiet Passion was very lacking.
  • The misses in A Quiet Passion reminded me of the misses in the the Dickensian series (here). The writers of Dickensian depicted Dickens as much too crabby and dark; the writers of that series forgot to show the JOY that Charles Dickens had in his own life and then gave some characters. For example, the nephew in A Christmas Carol was left out of the series – – this nephew was a jovial, wise, and kind character and was overlooked. The nephew was a man who kept on loving his Uncle Scrooge as he had a bit of a kinsman redeemer role.  That was left out!!  The writers also missed the personal joy that Dickens likely felt in some life areas – and he is depicted as annoyed all the time. Oh, and I like how one critic said that “Dickensian” was a “Jumble”- this jumble was like “EastEnders meets A Christmas Carol meets Great Expectations meets Oliver Twist meets Bleak House meets Our Mutual Friend.”  –
  • And hey, maybe when I am done reading Bleak House – I can check out Dickensian again and see the hints of that Bleak House connection.
  • Dickensian – was not “all” bad  – and a  huge takeaway from Dickensian was the high quality filming and cameras used- but the script was limited, just like the anemic script in A Quiet passion They both failed to accurately portray the balanced depths of these talented authors. 

CLOSING NOTES

Back in May 2019 – I promoted the book Lady by the River by sharing about Emily Dickinson for ten days (master post is HERE). It was fun and I think a good way to promote a book is to combine it with short posts about a classic author. 

So today, rather than share about Lady by the River, I will mention my book Avian Friends – because Emily enjoyed the birds, wrote about them numerous times, and wrote so much in her yard. This book is about enjoying birds and many pages unfolded in my yard

If you like birds and want a “light” read, you might want to add Avian Friends to your reading list.  It is available on Amazon and Kindle. I also plan on giving away a free copy when we do the Bleak House raffle in June. 

click here

also, the Sunday Stills challenge this week is #Feathered friends so linking up with that 🪶

  • Have you seen A Quiet Passion? Did you like it?
  • Have you seen Dickensian? Any thoughts on that? 
  • Have any other comments to share? 

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58 thoughts on “Brief Review of “A Quiet Passion” (Emily Dickinson Movie)

  1. Hi Yvette, I don’t watch any movies or TV, and it doesn’t sound like I’ve missed much with these two shows. I stopped watching movies because they are always so disappointing in comparison to the book. Some, like War of the Worlds, miss the entire point of the book. I do love Emily Dickenson’s poetry.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Robbie – it sounds like you made a good choice to avoid the movies – and even the best movies or mini series can never include the experience a book offers.
      I boxed that especially with Bleak House – the mini series is boring but the book is alive and rich –
      📚😊

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Terri
      Well I also included an old birdhouse photo – and Emily wrote about birds and so I think in my mind – connecting to your theme this week was natural – and the book at the end connected to Emily’s tats time as that book was birthed in my backyard – hahaha
      So I think it connected more to me and I should have maybe made it clearer
      🕊🦅

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I vaguely remember this movie when it came out. I don’t know anyone who saw it, so your review is interesting. I like Emily Dickenson’s poetry, but don’t know much about her life.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi ally bean – I learned a little more about Emily during my 2019 blog series featuring some of her work. And if you decide to watch the movie (on Amazon Prime) I would love to know your take on it….

      Liked by 1 person

  3. “the Dickinson family seemed to be an early version of the Adams Family” So in other words, at least something to watch… lol, I know, it wasn’t supposed tho be creepy and ooky. And there was supposed to more nature! Not a film I would want to see, despite my Adams Family joke. I did not see Dickensian, though I like who you turned to Dickens in the end, to get back to the challenge. Which reminds me, I think I will do a reminder tomorrow…
    Do you remember the movie Amadeus? The music, the costumes, etc were fabulous, but the story was 100% fiction and got all of the characters wrong, particularly poor Salieri, who actually did more to promote Mozart’s music than Mozart himself did! Oh well, there are few movies that do justice to artists of any type.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi T!
      Loved your adams family joke – (have their music and snap snap theme in my ear right now)
      I wasn’t sure I wanted to post about the disappointing movie – but because in 2019 I had my Emily Dickinson phase – I decided I had to make a post about it !
      The writer got it so wrong!
      😩
      I did see Amadeus but don’t recall much at all! It is pretty lame when the scripts are so inaccurate –

      There should be a law against that – hahaha📜

      Looking forward to your reminder post

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I haven’t seen the movie but it’s hard for me to believe the lady was that morose. I don’t recall her poems as being dark or heavy. But it has been a while since I studied her….

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi JT- thanks for checking out his post – and my advice of for screenwriters to pause and pay a little money to have literature folks offer advice on the script!
      Curtis corners on the writing might not seem
      Like a big deal at the time but it is a huge deal!

      Like

  5. So sorry about the movie being a disappointment, sounds like he did a great injustice to Emily Dickinson for sure! Wonder if there are other movies about her that do a good job? Emily was definitely a nature lover!
    Thanks for the recommendation about Avian Friends. Going to look it up!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Joy
      I didn’t see any other docs or movies about Emily and was hoping this one was going to be good – sigh….
      And what makes me sad is that so many viewers will assume it is truth .
      Thanks for checking out this post and see you tomorrow for some fun Tuesday thoughts

      Like

        1. Oh you made my day! And I am
          Terrible at promoting my books so I decided to try and promo them these next few months –
          Than again
          ☀️

          Like

        2. You are so welcome. I look forward to receiving it in the mail. 🙂 And I understand about the trouble with promoting your own books. I am the same way with my book. I never want to make people feel obligated to purchase it. And I didn’t with yours. I love birds and poetry, so it made sense to get it. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

        3. Well after I read your recent comment to TippyGnu – I think you will like avian friends a lot!
          And please share a link her to your book – I did not realize you had one –

          Liked by 1 person

        4. Oh Tippy and I joke around a lot like that! LOL! Eager to get it even more now. 🙂
          Yes, another blogger friend, Colin and I co-authored a book The Odessa Chronicles in 2018, It started wtih characters that I created in my blog stories and just took off in a way that I never expected. Was so much fun! Here is the link https://www.amazon.com/Odessa-Chronicles-Collection-Stories-Children/dp/1525520393/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2IAR2Z3I5U5US&keywords=The+Odessa+Chronicles+children%27s+book&qid=1653447812&sprefix=the+odessa+chronicles+children%27s+book%2Caps%2C85&sr=8-1

          Like

        5. Very welcome!! Thanks, it may be children stories but a lot of adults have enjoyed it! Its for the young at heart! 🙂 Those characters will always have a special place in my heart. They really are what led me to being more passionate about my writing and delving into fiction more.

          Like

    1. Thanks so much for joining me for this post!
      And I would love to hear your take on the movie when you see it!
      I would not say it was a waste of my time – but it was so “off” as it related to the Emily I perceive
      (Oh and side note – I chose your door for Dan’s May 2022 Thursday doors writing challenge)

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I still
          Need to write my story for the Thursday doors challenge –
          I have a few ideas but need to sit down and decide which direction to take
          Hope you are having a nice week

          Like

    1. Hi Janet – the movie is available right now on Prime – and it was not all bad and if you like her poems – there are some brilliant parts that have her poetry recited so well

      Like

        1. Hi Janet – – In 2019 this was not available on Prime – I remember because I put it in my watchlist and was surprised it was available now….
          anyhow – sounds like you have more than enough to watch along with your outdoor time and photo capture time 😉

          Liked by 1 person

  6. I know how passionate you are about her work and the great lengths you have gone to celebrate her on her birthday and pay tribute to her wonderful work.
    I appreciate and love your candid honest review.
    💖
    “I give the movie, A Quiet Passion, a “D” for the screenplay and scene progression, a “B+” for the acting, and an “F” for Emily depiction – because I think that Davies, the writer/director, inaccurately depicted the Emily Dickinson we get to know from her 1,775 poems”

    I’m so sorry but thanks for saving me from it as I don’t watch much tv as it is and it must be a 10 for me to even consider it.

    💖💖💖😘
    She would appreciate you… i sure do!
    💖

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Cindy
      Thanks for the comment and I really am

      😊Glad I watched the entire movie because there were artistic takeaways and the poetry being read was a bonus – but the writer should have consulted others to help his depiction 😩

      Also – your comment reminded me of Mabel’s recent interview and how so many folks misunderstand people who have “high introversion ” and how some folks just do not understand the peace of SOLITUDE – not all who pull back are loco
      Not all who pull back are funky and weird
      It all who pull back are embittered
      Maybe they can get a little awkward when a male suitor comes to call –
      Or a little awakened from less social practice – but some folks will
      Never understand the joy and peace from

      Quiet days (a quiet life) and solitude is not always weird, lonely, or funky times!
      🌺🌸🌺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes indeed it was good and you truly are her cheerleader and represent her so well and good to see the nuances and the depiction so you can be her voice! Will you write for me someday.. haha!
        Omg Yvette, I am so getting quieter and quieter and I think writing does that so someone .. it does me. I’m finding awkward places and only the bandwidth for limited interaction these day as writing and my solitude have replaced noise and excitement. It’s a little odd actually but it’s my truth tese day.

        TOTALLY!
        well said”:

        “Quiet days (a quiet life) and solitude is not always weird, lonely, or funky times!”

        🌺🌸🌺

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Cindy….
          I love how you wrote this

          “I am so getting quieter and quieter and I think writing does that so someone ”
          I agree!
          And you know I am a fan of Your poetry – the originality – the ease in which you Write them – and the passion, honesty, and human topics that connect to your years of being a health coach/healer

          ☀️☀️☀️☀️😊

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Thanks so much Yvette!
          Your words always put a smile on my face and leave me home as we might say to a place of contentment and peace!
          Thanks for your faith and encouragement always!
          That touched me deeply!
          🙏💕

          Like

  7. Wow – you were able to substantiate that film missed a lot about Emily. Your critique is enough for me to know I wouldn’t enjoy watching the movie, so shall skip it. I love Emily’s poems too – haven’t read any for a very long time though. Congrats on your book being available on Amazon now! YIPPEE – you must feel so great to have accomplished that!? Are you on to writing another?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Hi Shelley – I have more than 50 book ideas sort of in the works – and that is no exaggeration – hahaha – but I know that not all book ideas lead to con books!
      And do I send you a copy of avian friends? I can’t recall which one I sent you – but this has been on Amazon for almost five years –
      But I am still excited to the core! So proud
      And so thanks for that (and you know I am still curious about your dubious minimalism but will patiently wait… ha)
      Anyhow – another reason I mentioned my Avian Friends book here is because it was birthed and written in my backyard – not meant to be a book – but I was in a bit of an Emily Dickinson mode (sorta because I had a lot of time to write my morning journal in the yard) and I wrote about the trees and how I invited the birds by planting them – and then some poems from journaling were special enough for book content. When my nephew died, there were some baby birds making noise as we prepped for the funeral and that new life trickled the air to break heaviness.
      I also wrote a poem about seeing a bright red cardinal in the stark white ice cold winter – and had a poem about how “hope flew in” on a winter day when I heard the first bird song on a cold late January day!

      So the avian friends 😊book really has an Emily Dickinson vibe and I really didn’t mean to do that!☀️📚

      And you know – in a way – some of your posts have that Emily vibe as well – because your readers get to know the many moods or your property – from snowy days to the back camera shots!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow – that’s impressive to have 50 book ideas. My brain would be constantly spinning (more than it already is!).
        Yes, you did, and I haven’t gotten to finish reading it yet. I enjoy your poems and how you give a recap/explanation of the poems. I like to read one at a time and let the poems sit with me for a time before reading the next one. You have a knack for describing birds and their activities/antics that makes me smile and nod my head in agreement.
        I like writing poems, but had an awful experience with an English teacher that kind of turned me off to trying to write them. When my mood is right though, I do like to give off the vibes of trying an Emily approach – pictures always help.
        Happy writing to you! PS, I’ve been slowly introducing the Dubious Minimalism – had to work on a thrift sale first. Learing to let go is a big part of the DM movement. 😉

        Like

        1. Hi Shelley – first let me note that even though my Avian Friends book has an Emily Dickinson connection in that I wrote it in the yard and had a slower season (by choice) however – my poetry is not anything like hers! And likely never will be. In fact, the simplicity of mine is perhaps opposite of the way she poured over form and wording
          🌸🌸🌸

          With that said, I passed large gaps of time by writing journals with rhyme schemes – it was early In Colorado days and it helped me cope with a new life there to write in my notebook
          — I had no idea I was honing a skill – so perhaps not formal poetry and not following certain formats (but did have fun using cinquains and Diamonte poems with art lessons)-
          But thanks for saying that nice comment about my poetry because I am
          Fully aware it will not appeal
          To everyone – and if I tried too hard I think it would lose my essence!
          I think everyone has poetry in them – as it is about words and ideas leaving the formal paragraphs!
          But not everyone wants to be a poet and than (this might sound mean) but some folks write poetry that does not really feel like poetry – they write five sentences and call that their stanza – and I scratch my head! But who is to say that is cannot become a new form?
          And Emily Dickinson was defensive when her editor (of the few poems she did publish) well he changed a semi colon and something else to make it easier to read for the audience and she said that was not her goal ! Hmmmm – and maybe that prevented more of her work getting out there – sigh!
          A topic for the ages is mass appeal vs doing what we really want!
          –/

          🌺🌺🌺Anyhow – I actually have closer to 100 ideas for a books and more than 50 have an ISBN already – but “whoa Nellie” / hahaha- I pace myself and see which ones are viable (and let God lead of course)🌺🌺🌺

          Thanks again for you lovely comment and after your DM book idea or project – maybe (just maybe) you need to share more (in a book?) about the keto changes and healthy approach to getting away from chemicals!???
          Dr Zach Bush recently had a webinar with docs about sneaky and dangerous chemicals in skin, face and hair products – it reminded me of your fun shampoo post!

          Liked by 1 person

        2. There’s a writer in all of us just trying to claw our way out. Who said that? I can’t remember, but it fits.
          You’ve discovered your voice, and enjoy playing with it, that’s what is the most important.
          Oh, my, yes, chemicals, keto, DM, so many topics. I’ve got plenty of ideas, not sure they’re bookworthy, but personal blogworthy keeps me thinking and sharing. Just like reading and chatting with you does too!
          I’ll have to look up Zach Bush, that’s a new name for me. My skin has loved it since I gave up most of the chemicals. I still could use some more natural products. Another thing to research – but first, my wild weed filled gardens and some healthy time outside to get VIT D!!!
          Thanks for your encouragement and lively conversations. I look forward to hearing from you again!

          Liked by 1 person

        3. Hi – I hope you synthesized lots of vitamin D! ☀️☀️☀️
          It rained here all
          Week and finally got sunshine today
          So grateful
          Have a good day!

          Liked by 1 person

  8. I thought I may have watched a movie about Dickinson but nothing of your review was familiar. I’m pleased I read it though, as now I won’t need to watch the movie and share your disappointment.
    I find it amusing that you put off reading Bleak House by Dickens, to write a bleak post about a bleak movie about Dickinson.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hahaha / I love your play on words (yet again)
      And it is curious how sometimes we put things off – I am reading a book on writing (from 1966!) and the author has a fun little section on how everything else starts to appeal to you when dodging something.
      Getting back into bleak house was not fully bleak – love fulfilled -(love drones) a new little baby – and lots to chew on!
      And thanks for checking out this post 🌺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sounds like that book had to wait a long time for the timing to be right (write?), Yvette.
        I’m pleased everything was not bleak.
        I do apologise I don’t get to read and comment on all your posts. I seem to never have enough time to do all I want any more – never did for that matter – but I do what I can. 🙂

        Like

  9. Ok, I watched AQP…and I don’t know what to think. I’ve been a poetry and Dickinson fan since I was very young and of course learned about her reclusive personality so this storyline I understand. But I found it all very sad to watch her bickering w most everyone in her life. Was it truly who she was? was it her underlying illness? or simply a very strong, opinionated woman living in the wrong century? No matter the reason Emily produced beautiful words and quirky thoughts that speak to me still. I guess I agree w you, Yvette, and others. I’d like to think a bit of creative license was cobbled into A Quiet Passion.

    Like

    1. HI!
      Thank for coming back to share you take on AQP!
      Wow – the word cobbled was a good choice for what it felt like for me!
      And yes, the constant bickering and upset didn’t seem the right fit for someone who depicted so much emotional health and joy in her work!

      It exhausted me at times when the bickering or raised voices happened again!🤨

      😊💛cheers to your note about the beauty of her work – and how “Emily produced beautiful words and quirky thoughts that speak to me still.”
      //
      Although do you think Emily would have been displaced in our current culture too?- I do

      Like

      1. Displaced, like ostracized by peers? I think as a child, yes. As an adult maybe not so much .. sooo many self help commercials out there!!!!😅🤣

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes – I get your point!
          Thanks again for coming back to share that you watched the movie.
          I almost didn’t post my review (you know – someone’s I think it might not make a good post) and this one currently is at 475 reads! Gosh! That makes me feel so glad I posted this
          📚☀️
          – hope you have a nice holiday weekend

          Like

  10. I’m going to skip this movie based on your review. It does sound more Plath than Dickinson in a way. They seem to have missed the mark. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and the reasoning behind them. 😀

    Like

    1. Hi – thanks for taking the time to read this review post!
      It felt kind of good to feel so in the know about this poet – and that only happened because in May 2019, I took some time to go deeper with her poems!
      And Diana, I am not sure if this applies to fiction – but I feel poetry whispers and screams a lot about the writer and their wellness —
      📚
      So the content of her poems should have factored into the screen play
      🧳
      Oh and speaking of fiction – we are reading bleak house this spring and one scholar noted that dickens revealed his keen observational skills with the ailments and Illnesses he gave characters.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think that’s true, Yvette. The best poetry (IMHO) evokes emotions that rise out of the poet’s experience. Interesting about Dickens, isn’t it? I’d heard that he was socially conscious, especially about poverty.

        Liked by 1 person

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