PRIORHOUSE INTERVIEW: Robbie Eaton Cheadle

Today’s Interview features Roberta (Robbie) Eaton Cheadle, who is a South African author. She has worked in finance since 2001 and she also writes fiction and poetry.  In addition to having short stories and poems in numerous anthologies, Robbie has published ten children’s books and two novels:
Through the Nethergate, a historical supernatural fantasy

A Ghost and His Gold, a historical paranormal novel set in South Africa.

Now most readers of the Priorhouse blog know that I don’t read horror stories and I stay away from paranormal material – (just my preference for personal and spiritual reasons)-  but Robbie and I still connect through a variety of topics! And I am glad to have been blog friends with her for many years now!


Robbie blogs about books, shares her poetry, features authors, and provides book reviews. She recently provided an excellent review, here, about The Midnight Library by Matt Haig.  She also posts about food! I enjoy her recipe posts because they are hearty and often include real meat! She often includes a little backstory to why she made the dish or how she modified the recipe.

That leads to our first question in this interview – it relates to food and what you would bring to a potluck.

Priorhouse: I am reading a literary trivia book from Mental Floss (2021), which had a section on what famous authors liked to eat and what they “might” bring to a literary potluck.

  • Sylvia Plath: Tomato Soup Cake
  • John Steinbeck: Posole (can of chili and can of hominy)
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald: Turkey Leftovers
  • Harper Lee: Crackling Bread (made with pig skin)
  • Pearl S. Buck: Sweet and Sour Fish

So…. what would Robbie bring to a literary potluck?

Robbie: I would bring finger foods: mini quiches as a savoury and chocolate dipped citrus short bread as a sweet. Also, this is a fun idea. Some of the famous author responses are interesting.

Priorhouse: Yes, interesting indeed. I think I would bring a crock pot of tortilla soup (it used to be my top travel meal for small groups) but it would depend on the venue and season. Or maybe I would bring my version of your “lamb shanks in red wine sauce” – the recipe you made for Father’s Day (here)


Robbie: I always prefer meals that involve cooking meat in a sauce until it is soft and tender to those that involve baking meat in the oven. Here is one of the videos I made if readers want more information.

EXPERIENCE 

Can you tell us more about your experience with writing and publishing?

Robbie: I am a qualified chartered accountant and have seven professional publications with that.

  • Since my early teens, I have always written descriptive passages and poems and in 2014 I started writing poems again. Around the same time, I was helping my youngest son, Michael, learn to read and write and we started making up short stories about a little man made of chocolate who lived in a land where you could eat everything.
  • I read these little stories to the children in my Sunday School class and one of the other mother’s recommended I submit them to a few publishers for consideration. I did that and in April 2016 TSL Publications responded that they would like to help me publish the 7 books in the Sir Chocolate series Michael and I had written.
  • After some discussion, we decided that I should illustrate them with my cake and fondant artworks and also include 4 or 5 recipes for children to make under the supervision of a caregiver. Our idea was to have a first cookbook with a lovely story to go with it.
  • Sir Chocolate and the Strawberry Cream Berries story and cookbook was published in August 2016 and Sir Chocolate and the baby cookie monster story and cookbook in March 2017.
  • I started a blog, Robbie’s Inspiration – here– in October 2016. It was through blogging that I met a lot of other writers and poets and gained the confidence to make the plunge into writing for an adult audience.
  • TSL Publications has helped me tremendously with all aspects of my writing and publishing. I am very grateful to Anne Samson, who is a wonderful person.
  • Anne is also a historian and her knowledge of, and interest in, history is helpful to me when she reviews and edits my work.

Works in Progress

Priorhouse: What are you currently working on?

Robbie: I have a few novels and other books on the go at the moment. I am working on an adult novel called The Soldier and the Radium Girl, which is set between 1917, when the USA entered WW1, and 1938, when the radium girls won damages against their employer.
Priorhouse: That sounds interesting. Last year, I watched the movie about the radium girls and for those that don’t know, the radium girls “were female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning from painting watch dials with self-luminous paint.”
Robbie: The Soldier and the Radium Girl book is written from the point of view of Jake Tanner and it is about 50% done. I Hope to have it released in mid-2023. I am also working on a dystopian novel about climate change and the fourth industrial revolution.
In addition to these two novels, I am working on a book of African poetry, 99 poems of 99 syllables each. A few children’s books,
which includes a sequel to While the Bombs Fell. A collection of Halloween limericks and short poems illustrated with my fondant art.

Priorhouse: Robbie, you have a knack for getting SO much done!
I know your readers tell you this often- but sometimes we just do NOT know how you manage to get so much done! Wow.

Do you have any tips for writers? What works for you? 

Robbie: The only advice I can really give is to keep writing. The more you write, the more you practice and learn and the better your writing becomes. I can’t say it gets easier because I don’t think it does, but the quality improves.

  • I follow a lot of blogs that give advice about writing, poetry, and publishing and this interaction with the writing community has been invaluable to me. Other authors and bloggers encouraged me to make jumps forward with my writing, specifically when it came to transitioning from writing for children to writing for adults.
  • My children’s books are time consuming because I create all my own illustrations and develop the included recipes.
  • My adult books are time consuming because I do an enormous amount of research for them, and then I spend a lot of time polishing the prose and editing.
  • My poetry is easier, and I don’t spend nearly as much time writing it or polishing it. My poetry is a bit of a mind dump in syllables or verse and comes into my head, more or less, fully formed. I know some poets spend a lot of time editing their poetry but I’m usually happiest with my first attempts, baring any spelling and other language errors.

Priorhouse: I only recently discovered that you have been writing poetry for a long time. Can you tell us about the book with Kim Blades?

Robbie: Open a New Door book is a poetry collaboration with another South African poet, Kim Blades. All the poems are grouped under the headings of God Bless Africa, God bless my family and friends, and God bless corporates and work. The poems are further divided into the good, the bad, and the ugly of those relationships and experiences by each of the contributing poets.

Robbie: I am fond of Open a New Door as it includes the poems that I wrote long before I thought about getting anything published and provides a window into my thoughts and beliefs about these pivotal aspects of my life.

Priorhouse: What is one of your favorite poems?

Robbie: My favourite poem is “The Beggar’s Child”, which I wrote about a real woman and her small son. Everyday I used to see them in the same place, and I formed a habit of giving the mother gifts of food. One day, they disappeared, and I’ve never seen them again.

Priorhouse: While I was trying to find that poem on your blog, I found this fun post here – where you shared that your mother called you a “people collecter” because of the way you easily make acquaintances and do outreach with those in the community.

Robbie:  My mom is a wonderful ally, and she is my co-author for While the Bombs Fell, a fictionalised biography of her life growing up in a small town in Suffolk, UK during WW2. My mom reads all my novels and short stories and provides strong critics. She is my ‘ordinary reader’. After she has given me her input, I re-edit my books and then they go to a developmental editor for further feedback. That process also results in significant changes and re-writes, although these are reducing –  I take as a positive sign that I am improving as a novelist. 

Priorhouse: Can you tell us about your family life?

  • Compared to many people, I have an ordinary family life.
  • My husband is also a chartered accountant, and we work for the same firm.
  • It works well for us, and we often help each other with technical queries.
  • My husband is a calmer, more rational and reasonable personality than I am so he often must ‘talk me down’ from a state of intense emotional upheaval about work or personal matters.
  • I wrote a metaphorical poem that highlights our different personalities called Contrasting Colours. It is included in my poetry book, Behind Closed Doors.
  • I also have two wonderful sons, Gregory, and Michael. Michael is my co-author for the Sir Chocolate series and created the entire fantasy world of Chocolate Land and many of the characters. He is a very creative young man and is now embarking on his own fantasy novel. I am impressed by his world building and characterisations.
  • Gregory is my scholar and has recently started at university. He is studying for a Bachelor of Science degree specialising in computer science. Greg helps me from time to time with editing my YouTube videos.

Can you tell us something about you that is unique or not well known.

Robbie: My biological father died when I was three months old. When I was nine months old, my mother and I came to South Africa on a passenger ship. My mother met my dad and they were married when I was two years old.

What is your secret sauce to staying alive and staying fresh?

Robbie: Well, I suppose the opposite to being alive is not that attractive so I try to keep everyone in my family healthy. I am naturally a cheerful and upbeat person, so I don’t suffer from depression or a disinterest in life. I am always keen to grab opportunities that come my way from work opportunities to travel to anthologies. As a result, I can overextend myself and end up a bit overwhelmed. I always manage to get through everything and come out on the other side though.
Priorhouse: Yes, things seem
to be working out quite well.
Thanks so much for your time with this interview.
Robbie: Thank you very much for this opportunity, Yvette.

Follow Robbie Cheadle

Robbie Cheadle Amazon Author Page

Robbie Cheadle Goodreads Author Page

TSL Publications Robbie Cheadle Author Page

Twitter

Please leave any feedback in the comments.
And what would you bring to a literary potluck? 

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158 thoughts on “PRIORHOUSE INTERVIEW: Robbie Eaton Cheadle

    1. Hi Derrick – this interview reminded me that we all have different approaches and different levels of productivity!
      ☀️😊 (and Derrick you are amazing too with your consistent photography and Kighgs Tales)

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hi Derrick – Robbie’s mode right now reminds me that we all have different output and she has a knack for multitasking projects! hi Robbie !

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Good morning Robbie
      I am glad that you like how it came out and I have said this before but I am always amazed at how different each interview comes out!
      One of top takeaways here was regarding your recipes and what you would bring to a literary potluck!
      🥪🍱🧆

      Like

  1. I follow Robbie’s blog and, like you, I never cease to be amazed at how much she achieves. It makes me dizzy just watching!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Clive – thanks for the comment and one thing I learned from this interview was that Robbie does have a little editing help – which she says she is grateful for – and that helped me see that some of her productivity is from staying open to a bit of assistance while also being so fortunate to have a bit if assistance (not everyone has this option).
      😊☀️📚

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I think it’s how you use that help to support your creativity that makes the difference. Robbie recently had Covid for a month and still produced a huge amount of writing. I find her very impressive.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Hi Clive – I was surprised to hear how productive she was during COVID also! I guess she must not have gotten it too bad to still be able to pour out! When I had COVID I did get out of bed for a few hours but had two full days of almost all sleep! I forced myself to go on my first walk on day seven because I was feeling better and knew the walk was what my body and mind needed! But I can’t even imagine doing any work at during my COVID days / wow!
          So nice going RObbie
          (And Clive – do you have little “music elves”
          helping you with Tuesday tunes ? Or do you get all those stats and band info on your own? Lol – jk

          Liked by 2 people

        2. Hi Yvette. I admire you both for getting through it. Fingers crossed but I’ve stayed clear of it so far: my health is dodgy enough anyway without that as well!

          As for Tuesday Tunes, the song choices are mine and what I don’t know for the background is provided by the elves I send into Wikipedialand 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        3. HI Yvette, I don’t write on my books and stories every day. It is usually only over weekends. I didn’t have Covid so badly that I couldn’t get up at all. I had to work about four hours every day I was sick but I slept a lot in between. I definitely didn’t have Covid like some people have where they have been in bed for weeks and even in hospital. I had a terrible cough which went on and on and fatigue but I was still able to operate albeit at a much lower level than normal.

          Liked by 1 person

      2. Hi Yvette, I am very fortunate to have the assistance of an editor and a publisher and I am grateful or all the wonderful advice I get from them. I do a lot of editing and rewriting on my books and stories before they are published.

        Like

  2. Like everyone, I am always impressed by Robbie’s productivity. I like that you asked questions that expand what we already know. (I always bring guacamole to potlucks if I can find good avocados) (k)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi K! Thanks for the comment on providing a bit of new info with this interview because that was one thing I had to consider especially with Robbie because she has a lot on her blogs and is frequently featured on various forums.
      So – it was a little tricky and I am
      Glad a few tidbits were “fresh”
      ☀️☀️☀️

      Liked by 2 people

  3. A great interview, Yvette and Robbie. I learned a few new things about Robbie as well as some interesting tidbits about authors and their food choices. I enjoy Robbie’s recipes too, though I’m trying to eat less meat and carbs in my old age. 🙂 I can’t believe how many projects Robbie has in the works. No wonder she occasionally feels overwhelmed. I can handle only one thing at a time. Lol. And I loved this: “I can’t say it gets easier because I don’t think it does, but the quality improves.” That is so true. Great advice to authors in general. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Diana – I liked that Robbie shared that it does ” not necessarily get easier” for her — – even though I think for some writers it does get easier and easier
      For example – when I hear that some classics and award-winning novels were written in ten weeks or a small window – I see that as a skill that was honed and developed (and I can imagine Hugo or Dickens writing quickly with less and less editing needed)
      So I think for some authors it does get easier as they hone their craft and churn out material – maybe like a pianist who plays and plays – and then they begin to have some output feel like autopilot and with less of the early days of the birthing process -/ hmmm

      And because Robbie is successful in finance, I assume that is some serious left brain strengths which likely then helps her to keep so many projects organized – that probably comes very easy for her! ☀️📚 (am I correct Robbie?)

      Liked by 2 people

      1. HI Yvette, I think you are correct that my day job helps me keep my life very organised. I do a lot of project management in my work and being organised is essential. I also run with a few project at work on a month-to-month basis so I need to be able to jump between them. I have noticed that my writing doesn’t need as much restructuring or editing now as it did in the beginning so there is definitely a massive improvement, but I have to focus hard on keeping the quality up and ensuring I write my best work. It is for this reason that I don’t think it gets easier. Dickens and Hugo are absolute masters of writing. I can’t imagine I could ever write like they do, but I keep working towards it.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I notice that I get better at writing with experience, Yvette, but as I learn more, my standards also go up, so I expect more from myself – which isn’t easier. I do make fewer mistakes, but I’m also more attentive to the craft.

        Yes, some authors can write a first draft in ten weeks – that’s only about 1800 words a day, which is doable. But a book ready for publication? I think that’s rare. I wrote my first book (189,000 words) in 30 days. And it took 2 years to edit the mess! Ha ha.

        Like

    2. HI Diana, thank you for visiting me here. I am glad you enjoyed this post. Yvette did a marvelous job with it. I’m also glad that comment resonated with you. That has certainly been my experience of writing.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Robbie – I think your experience also is extra rich because of your amazing wide range of talent! Not everyone can do children’s books (both the art and writing) and then do fiction and poetry – as well as good book reviews – well sure many folks can have that package but truly not all – and I think the writers I was thinking of that might have had the process become easy – (and stream lined) well maybe it was because all they did was write one genre – that makes a difference eh?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Thanks a lot ladies! I might stop these posts when i reach 100 interviews (and I am almost half way there )- they are a highlight of the blog for me right now –
          Hope you both have a great rest of the day

          Liked by 1 person

  4. What a wonderful interview Yvette! I so lovely hearing more about Robbie and her impressive plethora and body of work she does!! It’s inspiring and there is something g for everyone!
    Love it!!💕💕🥰🤞

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Cindy
      Thanks for joining is this weekend! Something for everyone indeed – from food to poems to fiction to book reviews – ☀️📚😊

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Cindy – glad you joined us at lunch time because The food talk here was fun. And Robbie – thanks again for giving up some of your time to do this interview ☀️☀️☀️

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Annette – I like how you said her list of WIPs is exciting because it really does show how her creative juices are flowing! And she also seems to be pacing projects and gives things the care they need – like how that book is scheduled for 2023!
      ☀️😊

      Liked by 2 people

        1. Robbie – I think I have been following your since 2017 and so I have watched some of your progress! And as noted in the interview – I don’t sense that you rush it out factory style and you also stay open to a bit of input and editing – which shows the care and breathing time you give your projects.
          😊☀️

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Robbie is one of the hardest working bloggers I know! She’s a real dynamo. Oh golly, I’m not the best cook – I’d probably bring a couple of bottles of wine to a pot luck. Maybe pita chips and hummus!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi JT – I agree with Robbie that your potluck items sound perfect – and would go well with book parties as opposed to my soup that would likely be sloshing around !! Like who would want to slurp soup at a literary party? So i think I am more with the finger foods from Robbie or your hummus dip (maybe one of those variety packs with original, tomato, roasted red pepper, and maybe a garlic one?? Lol
      🍽🍛🧆

      Liked by 1 person

  6. How fun to see Robbie as your guest this week, Yvette! I’m glad to read this because I realized that good ole’ WordPress unfollowed her blog! Robbie is a terrific author and baker and I love what she can do with fondant!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Terry, it is lovely to see you here. WP does that to me too and sometimes I don’t realise it’s happened until I think “Oh, I haven’t seen a post form ABC for a while and I investigate and discover I’ve been unfollowed.” I’m glad you enjoyed this post and that you like my fondant. I am busy with a circus project right now and it is great fun.

      Liked by 2 people

        1. Terri and Robbie – I never understand the follies on WordPress because I constantly see bloggers I never recall following and then don’t see the regulars that I want to see. And so I am used to just going directly to a bloggers site to check in – or if they comment I use that as a nudge to visit them. But the reader and following pattern is puzzling!
          Terri / thanks for checking out this Robbie interview and hope everyone is having a nice Sunday

          Liked by 2 people

  7. Thanks for featuring Robbie, Yvette. The more I learn about her, the more I am impressed. Although I don’t handle the cooking, I always enjoy the posts that feature her recipes. I love her poetry.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Dan
      Thanks for joining us – and not sure if you saw that I almost added the link to book club mom’s post with Robbie (and she had a couple to use) well I also considered adding a link you me April 30th post when Robbie made it to the Bar post — I’ll add the link here

      https://nofacilities.com/2022/04/30/miriam-robbie-visit-the-bar-socs/

      But i didn’t add links to the blog post because I couldn’t decide on how many to add and didn’t want the post to get any longer (even tho these posts can be a little long – I think it is part of the fun)
      Anyhow – hope you have a great 4th

      Liked by 2 people

  8. What a truly uplifting and amazing interview! Robbie, you inspire me. You are always so busy with at least ten plates in the air at a time. Your recipes are scrumptious! Your poetry is touching. Your historical novels are wonderful as are your children’s books. I’m thrilled to see you in the spotlight here! Thank you, Yvette!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Jan, thanks for joining us for this interview and I like how you said “ten plates in the air” and also you are so familiar with Robbie’s work!
      Your comment also reminded me that sometimes when we are busy we get more done (like that saying about if you want something done – ask a busy person ) so perhaps momentum begets more momentum….
      Anyhow a wishing you a great day

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Your new book sounds interesting, Robbie. The radium girls made me think of the poor women who worked in match factories in the UK in Victorian times and suffered from ‘phossy jaw’ due to the phosphorus in the match heads. They probably hadn’t even heard of the word ‘compensation’.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Steve – I think your comment was on moderation and Robbie might have missed it because of that<

      The “phossy jaw” sounds interesting and I know a lady in FL who had a heart transplant and part of her health problems were from the factory she worked in years ago (she won a law suit) and Robby’s book sounds so good

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Great interview! I’m always amazed at your energy, Robbie 🙂 The mixture of cooking and children stories is a big hit in our house.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Really enjoyed the interview, but I have to say, I hadn’t thought about writers favorite foods. Sylvia Plath and Tomato Soup Cake. Who’s ever heard of that?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Jaqui! The tomato soup was new for me too – and it reminded me about Warhol’s tomato soup cans and how maybe there was a time when tomato soup was all the rave?

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Liz – thanks for joining us – and it sure is fun to get to know folks (and I look forward to your interview sometime later this year with tips for writer’s block)

      Liked by 1 person

        1. It feels so far off but I know the summer will zip on by! Can’t believe so much of July is passed already
          Anyhow – hope you have a nice day author Liz

          Liked by 1 person

  12. With the number of books and amount of blogging Robbie does, one would think she’s retired or unemployed. I’ve followed her since I started blogging over three years ago. I suspect that her son Gregory is doing well at university.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Pete, I really enjoy blogging. I feel like I have a home for my restless spirit here with all of my fellow bloggers and writers. Most of the people I blog with have similar ideas on life and society to me and that is very nice and comforting.

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Thanks for hosting Robbie on your blog. She is such a fab character, so prolific, and a great supporter of other writers and bloggers. Wishing her continued success – with and without her son, and to her whole family best wishes, stay safe and well. Have a great July everyone. x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Jame you are so right about how consistently supportive Robbie is of other writers and bloggers
      Also – many thanks for the well wishes for July!!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Excellent interview. Robbie’s poetry work-in-progress sounds interesting. Ninety-nine African poems of 99 syllables each? I’m already looking forward to reading it!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Priscilla – I agree that the 99 poems with 99 syllables sounds original and interesting
      I can also understand why something like that takes much time to create.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Hi Yvette, what a wonderful and comprehensive interview with Robbie. Like Clive wrote, I tend to get dizzy as well after reading of her many, many, many works in progress. I still don’t know how she does it all, writing that is, not to mention, her baking and cooking! But I do understand why she’d become overwhelmed. It was great to learn more about her and absorb her writing tips too. Thanks to both of you.
    ~Lauren ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Lauren – I’ll admit I got a little dizzy too- but Robbie really seems organized and like she has great time management.
      I have many projects started – more than 60 things I have in folders – but only work on two or three at a time. I also know some of those projects might be trashed – but we don’t know until we get to them.
      Best wishes with your writing too!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Robbie astounds me with all that she accomplishes! I’ve read most of her books and greatly enjoy her writing style (my favorite being While the Bombs Fell) and love her recipes and travel posts.
    I’m a soup girl myself, so I would probably bring a big, hearty pot of hamburger soup to the party.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Jacquie – when I read that you were bringing hamburger soup I instantly smoked because I was feeling like my titular soup would be silly for a literary meeting! But imagining a “big, hearty” batch of soup reminds me that writers might need the extra nourishment and comfort from such a meal! Ha!
      So sign me up for that meeting too – 😊🥣

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Lol, you’re more than welcome 🙂 Hamburger soup was a favorite with my customers at the cafe I owned for thirteen years. As you say, it’s hearty and comforting.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Mmmm – a customer favorite ? Sounds even better
          And I bet owning a cage for years helps enrich some aspects of your writing
          ☀️

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        2. Hi again author Biggar….

          😀Well being known a Mac and cheese queen is a pretty awesome thing -👑

          our family east keto – which means mostly low carbs and lots of meat –
          However – of course we can have side dishes when and if we want – and a complete treat for me is Mac and Cheese – (appreciate it more when having it less often)
          Make that having a “good Mac and Cheese” and so I assume your recipe is great!
          Anyhow – I had Mac and cheese twice this year –
          Once at Guy Fieri’s restaurant kiosk in Norfolk VA and then at a wedding earlier this month – and Jacquie – both times it was like a rich dessert -//
          Mmmm
          So – If we ever have a real literary potluck – I might advocate for your Mac and cheese – hahshshs

          Liked by 1 person

        3. Yes!
          Maybe Mac and cheese is not so lowly – ha
          And I can’t have too much of it but I’d rather have that then cookies or pie – mmmm

          Liked by 1 person

  17. Hi Robbie and readers – just wanted to say that I’ll be back online in a few days to catch up here – and I look forward to it – there is some good chatting going on!
    Wishing everyone a great day and be back soon
    ☀️😊📚

    Liked by 1 person

  18. What a wonderful interview. I thoroughly enjoyed it. I thought I knew Robbie, but I still had more to learn. Great questions and responses, Yvette. I love the way you make it all flow.

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  19. What an interesting interview. I am learning so much more about you, Robbie. Where do you find the time to do all that you do? Thank you for sharing your story.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. This is such a lovely interview with Robbie. I’ve seen Robbie around on the writing blogs, so it was a pleasure to get to know more about her here. Loved reading how the Sir Chocolate series came to life. Sometimes when you play around with ideas for writing, they take a life of their own over time.

    It really does sound like Robbie has the best time management skills! Writing is indeed time consuming no matter which genre you write. Like you, I spend a lot of time editing and refining writing until I am happy with it 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. HI Mabel, it is lovely to see you here. I am glad you enjoyed the article and how Sir Chocolate came into being. Editing and proofing does take a lot of time. I do enjoy editing, I find improving and polishing my stories fulfilling.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Loved seeing Robbie featured here today Yvette. Always something new to learn about our writing friends in interview. I’m with Sylvia Plath – one of my favs, I’ll take the cake and tomato soup. Lol 🙂 xx

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Wow! That was a satisfying in depth interview. Thank you!
    Roberta, you are an amazing talent. You deserve this accolade. Resa 🤗

    Like

    1. Hi Resa – thanks for your lovely comment to Robbie and appreciate you checking out the interview
      ☀️📚😊

      Like

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